HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Using lasers, biologists succeed in getting cells to change course

CHAPEL HILL - Most people probably think that most cells in the body -- not counting blood cells -- stay in one place their entire lives just as whole plants do, but nothing could be further from the truth.

These microscopic living structures move a little or a lot, healing wounds, developing embryos, scouting and attacking disease-causing invaders and, sometimes, spreading cancer. As a result, the mechanics and chemistry of how cells get themselves from one place to another fascinates researchers around the world.

Now, using a beam of laser light only a few microns in diameter, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists have succeeded for the first time in getting such light to alter the course of a moving cell. They have accomplished that by having the laser create active proteins from what are called "caged" proteins that they introduced into the cell.

A report on the research appears in the May 28 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology.

The work has begun attracting attention from other scientists internationally.

"We put caging groups on particular amino acids of the protein we were interested in inside single cells and that makes the proteins less active," said Dr. Kenneth A. Jacobson, professor of cell and developmental biology at the UNC School of Medicine. "Then we directed the laser beam into part of the cells to break the bond between the caging group and the amino acid so that the protein became active again. Afterward, depending on where we shined the light, cells turned by as much as 90 degrees."

Their experiments might be likened to putting the breaks on one rear wheel of a car so that the car would tend to pull to one side or another, Jacobson said.

Besides Jacobson, UNC authors are Drs. Partha Roy, a postdoctoral fellow soon to join the research faculty, and Zenon Rajfur, research associate. Drs. Gerard Marriott and Leslie Loew of the universities of Wisconsin and Connecticut, respectively,
'"/>

Contact: David Williamson
David_Williamson@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
21-Jun-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Using statistics to decipher secrets of natural mutation
2. Using science to restore habitat for declining species
3. Using soils as filters to prevent crypto from moving to the groundwater
4. Using a companion crop to control weeds organically
5. Using plants and microbes to purify polluted industrial wastewater
6. Using GPR to estimate tree root biomass
7. Using computational power tools to bolster systems biology
8. Using RNA interference to tune gene activity in stem cells
9. Using sewage sludge as fertilizer
10. Using the oceans living light shows to fight terrorism or track the planets most massive migration
11. Using genetic research to treat inflammatory diseases Vienna centre of excellence in biomedicine harnesses basic research

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Using lasers biologists succeed getting cells change course

(Date:5/21/2015)... -- According to a new market ... Services), by Applications (Surveillance (Airborne, Maritime, Land), Threat ... & Defense & Commercial) - Global Forecast to ... expected to grow from $7252.0 Million in 2015 ... Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 6.6%. ...
(Date:5/20/2015)... 2015 Research ... the addition of the  "5-year Opportunity ... Market"  report to their offering.  ,     ... analyses trends in the iris recognition ... sectors, globally. Despite hardware pricing and ...
(Date:5/19/2015)... , May 18, 2015 Fingerprint Cards ... FPC1020, FPC1025, FPC1145, FPC1155 and FPC1035 from one if its ... until and including Q3 2015 and the sensors will be ... Communicated order values for 2015 hereby amount to 740 MSEK ... 2015 of 140 MSEK and a number of smaller orders ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Thermal Imaging Market Worth $9,998.9 Million by 2020 2Thermal Imaging Market Worth $9,998.9 Million by 2020 3Thermal Imaging Market Worth $9,998.9 Million by 2020 4Global Iris Recognition Market Report 2015 - 5-Year Opportunity Analysis 2Fingerprint Cards Receives Touch Fingerprint Sensor Order of SEK 230 Million and Raises Revenue Guidance for 2015 2
(Date:5/27/2015)... May 27, 2015 Expanding in a ... manufacturer Avalon Biomed Inc. recently inked a ... Mokuda Dental Co. Ltd. , the largest endodontic distributor ... the international market for Avalon Biomed, which manufactures Grey ... tricalcium silicate-based dental cements that have won renown from ...
(Date:5/27/2015)... SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. , May 27, 2015 ... for the treatment of cancer, today announced the ... financial officer and Cynthia Ladd as ... joining CytomX, Goeltz was chief financial officer of ... served as an independent consultant and legal counsel ...
(Date:5/27/2015)... , May 27, 2015  RXi Pharmaceuticals ... focused on discovering and developing innovative therapies primarily ... an update on the status of the Company,s ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130917/NE80755LOGO ... 3,085 and 21 shares of Series A Preferred ...
(Date:5/26/2015)... WORMS, GERMANY (PRWEB) May 26, 2015 ... W. R. Grace & Co. (NYSE: GRA) announces ... received good manufacturing practice (GMP) certification from EXCiPACTâ„¢, ... distributors of pharmaceutical excipients. , All ... brand of pharmaceutical grade excipient silica gels have ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dental Manufacturer Avalon Biomed Inks Major Deal with Japanese Distributor 2Dental Manufacturer Avalon Biomed Inks Major Deal with Japanese Distributor 3CytomX Expands Executive Leadership Team 2CytomX Expands Executive Leadership Team 3RXi Pharmaceuticals Provides an Update on Series A and Series A-1 Preferred Stock 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Provides an Update on Series A and Series A-1 Preferred Stock 3CORRECTION: Grace European Facility Receives GMP Excipient Certification for SYLOID® FP Silica Gel 2
Cached News: