Virginia Tech researchers receive $450,000 award to model cell division

BLACKSBURG, Va., June 26, 2002 Cancer is a group of diseases involving misregulation of cell growth and division. The more we know about how cells grow and divide under normal circumstances, the better we will understand how things go awry in cancer cells.

For this reason, John Tyson, University Distinguished Professor of Biology at Virginia Tech, and Bela Novak, professor of biotechnology at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics, are developing mathematical models of the molecular mechanisms that control the way yeast cells grow and assume various shapes.

Their work is being supported by a $450,000 grant from the James S. McDonnell Foundation of St. Louis, Mo.

"Division and shape are important to yeasts because, by growing in specific directions, they are able to seek out viable environments and potential mates," Tyson said. "Understanding how yeast cells control these processes is important to us not only because of the cancer connection, but also because we are still very much in the dark about how genes regulate behavior in the broadest sense.

"While the genome project has provided a parts list of the cell, scientists need a schematic diagram of how all those parts hook together," Tyson said. "From the schematic diagram, we can write equations that govern the behavior of the control system, much like an electrical engineer can write equations for a circuit diagram. With these equations we can predict how a cell will behave under many different conditions."

Although a human cell is more evolved than a yeast cell, a human cell is made of the same sorts of parts that behave in the same way. It was found that "the molecular constituents of the cell cycle control system are functionally interchangeable between yeast and humans," Tyson said. "What we learn about cell division in yeast can be carried over to humans." From what they learn about the molecular mechanism of yeast cell growth and division, Tyson

Contact: John Tyson
Virginia Tech

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Two Virginia Tech energy-related inventions win R&D 100 awards
2. Virginia Tech researchers to release findings on Smith River Project
3. Virginia Tech professor honored with DeLaval Award
4. Virginia Techs smelly corpse plant due to bloom Aug. 4
5. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute researcher advances fight against sudden oak death disease
6. Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research helps implement global climate change initiative
7. Cell cycle research earns biologist Virginias top scientist award
8. Virginia Tech-led group receives third five-year international biodiversity grant
9. Virginia Tech researcher receives $1.8 million to study Arabidopsis genome
10. Virginia Tech and North Carolina State University to run Forest Nutrition Research Cooperative
11. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute central to Regional Center of Excellence

Post Your Comments:

(Date:6/3/2016)... , June 3, 2016 ... von Nepal hat ... Lieferung hochsicherer geprägter Kennzeichen, einschließlich Personalisierung, Registrierung ... in der Produktion und Implementierung von Identitätsmanagementlösungen. ... Ausschreibung im Januar teilgenommen, aber Decatur wurde ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... superior patient care by providing unparalleled technology to leaders of the medical imaging industry. ... recently added to the range of products distributed by Ampronix. Photo - ... ... ... ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... May 3, 2016  Neurotechnology, a provider of ... MegaMatcher Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) , a ... projects. MegaMatcher ABIS can process multiple complex biometric ... combination of fingerprint, face or iris biometrics. It ... and MegaMatcher Accelerator , which have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... --  Ginkgo Bioworks , a leading organism design ... awarded as one of the World Economic Forum,s ... innovative companies. Ginkgo Bioworks is engineering biology to ... in the nutrition, health and consumer goods sectors. ... including Fortune 500 companies to design microbes for ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... SAN DIEGO , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... that more sensitively detects cancers susceptible to PARP ... individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The new test ... of HRD-targeted therapeutics in multiple cancer types. ... therapies targeting DNA damage response pathways, including PARP, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at ... most commonly-identified miRNAs in people with peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the ... read it now. , Diagnostic biomarkers are signposts in the blood, lung fluid ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... WI (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... supplements, is pleased to announce the launch of their brand, UP4™ Probiotics, into ... for over 35 years, is proud to add Target to its list of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: