HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
WSU ecologist says defense by plants to disease may leave them vulnerable to insect attack

Some of the defenses plants use to fight off disease leave them more susceptible to attack by insects, according to a Don Cipollini, Ph.D., a chemical ecologist at Wright State University.

Cipollini, an assistant professor of biological sciences, presented a research paper on this topic this month at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Savannah, Ga.

"Plant Resistance and Susceptibility" was the title of the session where Cipollini presented his findings. "My research shows that induction of a particular plant response to pathogens that results in enhanced resistance to disease (termed systemic acquired resistance) can nullify the induction of resistance to feeding by some insects," he explained. "This interaction can result in the unfortunate tradeoff where plants become resistant to some diseases, but more susceptible to some insects. This phenomenon represents an ecological cost of resistance."

His study, done in collaboration with researchers at the University of Chicago, illustrates the effects of salicylate, a natural plant chemical, on resistance of the plant species Arabidopsis thaliana to the beet armyworm larvae (Spodoptera exigua). Salicylate is chemically similar to the aspirin that humans take, and it functions in nature to heighten plant defenses to pathogens, or disease-causing microbes. When applied to plants, salicylate can interfere with the induction of resistance to some insects, however, leaving them more susceptible to insect feeding damage.

Cipollini's research, which has funding support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has implications for crop plants in which salicylate-mediated defenses have been either genetically engineered or chemically manipulated. It also illustrates natural constraints on the evolution of plant resistance.

A major research interest of the Wright State scientist is how plants cope with insects and diseases. This includes examining biochemical mechan
'"/>

Contact: Don Cipollini, Ph.D.
don.cipollini@wright.edu
937-775-3805
Wright State University
25-Aug-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Brown ecologist garners major National Science Foundation grant
2. Rutgers ecologists and Brooklyn Botanic Garden botanists to plan Beijing Olympics Forest Park
3. New book urges ecologists to think outside the helmet
4. Duke ecologist finds devastation, hope in Iraqi marshes
5. Scientists re-evaluating the meaning of desertification, Duke ecologist says
6. UNC ecologists find floodplains particularly vulnerable to invasion by exotic plant species
7. Duke ecologists book offers hopeful view of Earths plight
8. Inaugural award for population ecologist
9. PNNL lands $10.3 million NIH biodefense contract to unlock proteomes of salmonella and pox
10. Bodys own defense against H. pylori, cause of stomach ulcers and stomach cancer
11. HIV reveals evolution of a primate defense against intragenomic infiltrators

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/1/2020)... ... July 01, 2020 , ... Catalent, a global ... of Teva-Takeda Pharmaceuticals’ packaging facility in Minakuchi, located in the Shiga prefecture of ... located in Kakegawa, the new 60,000-square-foot facility will provide customers with flexible clinical ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... ... June 24, 2020 , ... eClinical Solutions ... data services that accelerate drug development, is collaborating with Karyopharm Therapeutics (Nasdaq: ... hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This is the first study of an XPO1 ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... ... pleased to announce the next event in a series of TOPIQ webinars, which ... TOPIQ series of webinars was developed in response to social distancing measures that ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... ... eSource has long been touted as the solution to high data management ... reasons it did not take off as quickly as people initially expected, and where ... towards capturing data electronically for clinical trials and then repurposing it for downstream analysis, ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... ... “We are thrilled to deliver this new technology to the industry” said Matt Hundt, ... market and we were pleased that the IFT jury recognized that.” reFRESH™ couples the ... natural way to extend the shelf life and improve the safety of perishable foods ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... , ... July 09, 2020 , ... ... 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) is commonly used to suppress pigment formation in zebrafish embryos, maintaining ... research team led by Dr MA has been using the zebrafish model to ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... GREEN, Ohio (PRWEB) , ... June 29, 2020 ... ... that offers access to competitively procured purchasing contracts to its membership, recently named ... to provide TIPS members with the opportunity to purchase ergonomic seating, cafeteria tables, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: