HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
ASU researchers find link between social behavior, maternal traits in bees

One of the puzzling questions in the evolution of bees is how some species developed social behaviors. Arizona State University Life Sciences associate professor Gro Amdam thinks part of the answer can be traced back to bee reproductive traits.

A paper describing Amdam's experiments, "Complex social behavior derived from maternal reproductive traits," is the cover story of the current issue (Jan. 5, 2006) of Nature. Additional authors include M. Kim Fondrk and Robert Page from Arizona State University, and Angela Csondes from the University of California, Davis.

Honeybees live in highly complex communal societies that include divisions of labor among worker bees. Workers are female bees whose jobs include cleaning, maintaining and defending the hive, raising the young and foraging for nectar and pollen.

Other species of bees, like carpenter bees, do not engage in social behavior and instead lead solitary lives. This has prompted researchers to look into how social structures and divisions of labor have arisen in bees from their solitary ancestors. Amdam's research supports the idea that elements of the reproductive behavior of those ancestors evolved to form a basis for social living and divisions of labor.

This insight provides evidence for how complex social behavior evolves--evidence that could have value for studies of social behavior in other animals, possibly even humans.

"How social life emerged from a solitary lifestyle is a fundamental question," Amdam said. "One theory is that social behavior emerged through new evolutionary inventions. Another is that ancestral solitary phenotypes (characteristics of an organism) were the building blocks of social life, providing a foundation from which social forms could be assembled. For bees, our research supports the latter theory."

Amdam's research began as a doctoral dissertation at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. She continued the work at University of Cal
'"/>

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University
4-Jan-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Innovative tagging technique may help researchers better protect fish stocks
2. Penn researchers discover how key protein stops inflammation
3. ASU researchers partner with UOP to make biofuel for military jets a reality
4. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
5. Penn researchers discover pathway that eliminates genetic defects in red blood cells
6. U-M researchers find family of on switches that cause prostate cancer
7. 2007 EURYI: 20 young researchers to receive Nobel Prize-sized awards for breakthrough ideas
8. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
9. MGH researchers confirm that bone marrow restores fertility in female mice
10. Smithsonians National Zoo researchers use electronic eggs to help save threatened species
11. U-M researchers identify gene involved in breast cancer

Post Your Comments:
(Date:8/27/2014)... Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds ... when they make risky decisions, new research has shown. ... University of Warwick,s Department of Psychology, conducted tests that ... more likely to gamble for high-value than low-value rewards. ... argue that the test results show the important role ...
(Date:8/26/2014)... a colony of harmful bacteria, biofilms make the ... in a biofilm pose a significant health risk ... treatment, and biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 ... are 50 to 1,000 times more resistant to ... we may have stumbled onto a magic bullet," ...
(Date:8/26/2014)... pressure from policymakers, consumers, and suppliers has prompted ... reducing the pollutants they emit from their smokestacks ... must also assess environmental performance at every step ... materials to the use and recycling of their ... the discipline known as life cycle engineering, which ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds 2Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections 2Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections 3Yale journal explores advances in sustainable manufacturing 2
(Date:8/27/2014)... MONMOUTH JUNCTION, N.J. , Aug. 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... developing innovative drug delivery technologies, today announced that it ... New Jersey Business & Industry Association,s 2014 Awards ... Finalists were selected by an independent panel of judges ... member company volunteers. Award winners will be honored at ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... White City, OR (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 ... it stands to reason that the next beverage craze ... Force Technology announced today that formulators can use Stress ... any ingredient used in the making of a beverage, ... natural release for stress-generated energy, channeling that power into ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 WriteResult, LLC ... – has once again shown superiority when it comes ... by completing the ePRO portion of their most recent ... The Japan-based pharma chose WriteResult’s digital writing platform to ... – the first to complete drew data from a ...
(Date:8/26/2014)... , Aug. 26, 2014  NeuroSigma, Inc., a ... to develop bioelectronic technologies, today announced that it has ... U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission relating to a proposed ... of shares to be offered and the price range ... Jefferies LLC will act as the book-running ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Tris Pharma Selected as an award winner in the New Jersey Business & Industry Association's 2014 Awards for Excellence 2Stress Relief: 1 Way to De-Stress Your Beverage Formula 2Stress Relief: 1 Way to De-Stress Your Beverage Formula 3Stress Relief: 1 Way to De-Stress Your Beverage Formula 4A Perfect Record: WriteResult Maintains a 100% On-Time ePRO Record with Latest Irritable Bowel (IBS) Study Data Lock 2
Cached News: