HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
All the eggs in one basket

Current conservation assessments of endangered Caribbean sea turtles are too optimistic, according to Loren McClenachan and colleagues from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. McClenachan, Jeremy Jackson and Marah Newman agree that conservation efforts since the 1970's have dramatically helped increase green and hawksbill turtle populations that nest on protected beaches. However, they argue that dwindling turtle populations on many historically important nesting beaches are overlooked by conservation assessments that focus instead on the few large nesting sites that remain. The study, "Conservation implications of historic sea turtle nesting beach loss," appears in the August issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

The researchers present the first maps of historical nesting populations

Hunted for hundreds of years for food and for decorative purposes, turtle populations were greatly reduced by people. Using trade records from 163 historic sources in four time periods in 20 Caribbean regions, McClenachan and colleagues mapped the historic nesting areas of green and hawksbill turtles, and used density descriptions and harvest data to categorize "major" and "minor" nesting sites.

Historically, large nesting populations existed throughout the Caribbean. The researchers estimated 59 nesting sites existed for the green turtles, and 55 sites existed for the hawksbill turtles. Based on their results, 20 percent of historic nesting sites have been lost entirely due to land development and turtle exploitation, and another 50 percent of the remaining sites have been reduced to dangerously low populations.

"The loss of even a single nesting site makes a permanent, irreversible dent in the sea turtle population," says McClenachan.

The scientists estimate that today's current population of 300,000 turtles once was as large as 6.5 million adult turtles in the Cayman Islands in the 17th Century, with
'"/>

Contact: Annie Drinkard
annie@esa.org
Ecological Society of America
1-Aug-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Hanging baskets of sex and death help fruit growers

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/2/2020)... REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... July 01, ... ... stage biotech company, presented its phase 1a findings of Neihulizumab, a biologic for ... annual conference in June 2020. Led by hemato-oncologist Dr. Paul J Martin of ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... , ... July 01, 2020 , ... ... awareness and solutions for glioblastoma—the most common and aggressive adult brain cancer—announced today ... JD, PhD. Senior Fellows are charged with supporting the organization’s initiatives and overall ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... ... June 24, 2020 , ... eClinical Solutions ... data services that accelerate drug development, is collaborating with Karyopharm Therapeutics (Nasdaq: ... hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This is the first study of an XPO1 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/7/2020)... ... August 06, 2020 , ... VGXI, a highly ... closed on the purchase of greenfield for a new, expanded manufacturing facility. The ... 21 acres in the initial acquisition, with an option to purchase an additional ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... radar transmitter systems that can be configured to drive Klystrons, TWTs, IOTs, and ... can drive one or two switches in a push-pull configuration; yielding fast fall ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 30, 2020 , ... ... today announced the release of its signature product called Beacon - a ... and other field medical professionals. , Beacon helps MSLs streamline communication ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... TORONTO (PRWEB) , ... July 17, 2020 , ... ... and global consulting firm for the life sciences and food industries, is pleased ... new Director of Clinical Research – Business Development. , Charles is an accomplished ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: