HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Amphibians in losing race with environmental change

ecies lay their eggs communally or congregate socially, often to avoid predation or improve resource use. But global warming has caused higher levels of certain infectious diseases of some amphibians, and it spreads more easily in closely connected communities.

"Although relatively rapid evolution may occur within some amphibian populations when a novel threat arises, other threats may be too intense and too new for amphibians to cope with them," the researchers wrote in their report. "Behaviors and ecological attributes that have probably persisted, and were probably beneficial, for millions of years . . . under today's conditions may subject amphibians to a variety of damaging agents."

Natural selection and species adaptation may, in time, allow amphibians to react to and recover from the new environmental insults, Blaustein said, if they don't go extinct first.

But evolution is an erratic, often slow and imperfect system, and the complexities of amphibian life cycles makes them more immediately vulnerable than many other species, the researchers said.


'"/>

Contact: Andrew Blaustein
blaustea@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-9869
Oregon State University
1-May-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Amphibians in dramatic decline; Up to 122 extinct since 1980
2. Remicade data in ankylosing spondylitis show improvement in spinal mobility and spinal inflammation
3. Brain networks strengthened by closing ion channels
4. Picky-eater flies losing smell genes
5. Opening and closing the genome
6. Closing in on lethal heart rhythm in young athletes
7. Scientists closing in on nerve proteins contributions to memory and hearing loss
8. Common environmental chemicals in diet affect fetal ovarian development
9. Early environmental exposure may accelerate age-related neurodegeneration
10. Innovative subsea separation technology wins 2007 EUREKA environmental award
11. Who needs environmental monitoring?

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/24/2017)... The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed ... received the prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, ... picture on the right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology (Touch-based and Touchless), Product ... by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth USD 18.98 billion by ... Continue Reading ... ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160303/792302) ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a provider ... today announced the release of the SentiVeillance ... improved facial recognition using up to 10 surveillance, ... computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based facial ... it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/25/2017)... , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... leading supplier of Common Lisp (CL) development tools, and market leader for ... includes key performance enhancements now available within the most effective system for developing ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... ... Leaders of Quorum Review IRB and Kinetiq , the consulting ... Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) 2017 Meeting & Expo with topics ... excited to present subject matter expertise on topics that impact the global clinical research ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The University of ... round funding to three startups through the UConn Innovation Fund. The $1.5 million ... startups affiliated with UConn. , The UConn Innovation Fund provides investments of up ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... April 20, 2017 , ... As part of ... explore challenging patient cases when screening for direct oral anticoagulant. When patients taking ... need for bridging parental anticoagulation especially for those at high risk of thrombosis ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: