HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
An insecure role for Securin in chromosome segregation

A critical aspect of cell division, or mitosis, is that the progeny cells must receive the full complement of chromosomes. Failure of this mechanism, which sometimes happens in cancer cells, leads to rampant chromosome loss and mutations that encourage proliferation and increase instability. Understanding how normal cells unerringly transmit a full chromosome set to their daughters has long been an important part of the fight against cancer.

In a new study published online in the open-access journal PLoS Biology, Katrin Pfleghaar, Michael Speicher, and colleagues reinvestigate the cell's ability to undergo mitosis when missing a key protein, securin. Securin is a chaperone protein that regulates an enzyme that initiates the segregation of the sister chromatids during mitosis. They found that, contrary to previous reports, human cells devoid of the securin protein, which initially suffer widespread chromosome losses, can actually recover after a certain time has passed. In fact, cells with abnormal mitoses and chromosome counts became rarer until, after a few weeks, the cells appeared indistinguishable from their relatives with an intact securin gene. Pfleghaar and her colleagues speculate that securin normally plays an important role in mitoses, but that in its absence, cells tap into compensatory mechanisms to restore proper chromosome segregation.

The implications for cancer treatment are potentially great, as mathematical models of cancer growth do not usually include the possibility that cell populations might recover from chromosomal instability. In addition, such recovery from securin loss, like that seen here, might interfere with therapies that aim to kill cancer cells by exacerbating their chromosome losses.


'"/>

Contact: Paul Ocampo
press@plos.org
415-624-1224
Public Library of Science
28-Nov-2005


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Biologists at Tufts University discover 1 reason why chromosomes break, often leading to cancer
2. Double identities lie behind chromosome disorders
3. St. Jude study yields secrets of chromosome movement
4. Physicist cracks womens random but always lucky choice of X chromosome
5. Researchers shed light on shrinking of chromosomes
6. Researchers attach genes to minichromosomes in maize
7. Baumann Lab defines proteins that distinguish chromosome ends from DNA double-strand breaks
8. New technique will produce a better chromosome map
9. Short chromosomes put cancer cells in forced rest
10. Shortening chromosomes cause for earlier cancer onset in families with rare syndrome
11. The pull of bacterial chromosome segregation

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: insecure role for Securin chromosome segregation

(Date:8/19/2014)... release is available in German . ... inherently intermittent energy sources. If a large amount of electricity ... future, excess energy will have to be stored during productive ... existing storage capacities are far from adequate for the purpose. ... One important focus lies on battery systems that used to ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... a lemur. It,s not an African Bush Baby or even ... and downright "cool" primate from Southeast Asia. , "It,s really ... Rafe Brown, curator-in-charge at the University of Kansas, Biodiversity Institute. ... furry body; a long tail with a furry tuft at ... look a bit like the disks on the digits of ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... retail seafood counters in 10 different states show ... to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful ... fish of the same species, but from a ... according to new research by University of Hawai,i ... is essential to allow consumers to choose sustainable ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Asian inventions dominate energy storage systems 2Asian inventions dominate energy storage systems 3Philippine tarsier gets boost from Kansas research, and genetic proof of a new variety 2Philippine tarsier gets boost from Kansas research, and genetic proof of a new variety 3Seafood substitutions can expose consumers to unexpectedly high mercury 2Seafood substitutions can expose consumers to unexpectedly high mercury 3
(Date:8/20/2014)... have it that American Indians largely were wiped out ... and tuberculosis brought to the New World by European ... million people lived in the Americas shortly before Europeans ... by European diseases., But new research led by anthropological ... Krause of the University of Tubingen in Germany indicates ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... , Aug. 20, 2014 Neurotrope, ... host a conference call to provide an update ... p.m. Eastern daylight timeDial-in numbers:(888) 505-4369 (U.S. and ... Live web cast: www.neurotropebioscience.com , under "Investor Relations"The ... after completion through September 2, 2014 at (888) ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... , Aug. 20, 2014  Decision Resources Group finds that ... Russia , India and ... billion in 2013, roughly equal to the size of ... the BRIC market will experience much faster growth as a result ... population. Other key findings from Decision Resources Group,s coverage ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... The 6th Annual Arrowhead Personalized and ... 29-30 in San Francisco, CA. This year’s conference brings ... and clinicians focused on addressing and solving the significant ... twelve years since the sequencing of the human genome, ... pharmacogenetic information in the label and molecular diagnostics have ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Unusual discovery leads to fascinating tuberculosis theory 2Unusual discovery leads to fascinating tuberculosis theory 3Neurotrope To Host Conference Call 2BRIC Vascular Access Device Market Valued at $1.6 Billion in 2013, Similar to the U.S. Market 2BRIC Vascular Access Device Market Valued at $1.6 Billion in 2013, Similar to the U.S. Market 36th Annual Personalized and Precision Medicine Conference Bringing Together Thought Leaders to Discuss Clinical Implementation, Dx Reimbursement, Big Data, and Sequencing 2
Cached News: