HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Antarctic marine explorers reveal first biological changes after collapse of polar ice shelves

Once roofed by ice for millennia, a 10,000 square km portion of the Antarctic seabed represents a true frontier, one of Earth's most pristine marine ecosystems, made suddenly accessible to exploration by the collapse of the Larsen A and B ice shelves, 12 and five years ago respectively. Now it has yielded secrets to some 52 marine explorers who accomplished the seabed's first comprehensive biological survey during a 10-week expedition aboard the German research vessel Polarstern.

While their families at home in 14 countries were enjoying New Year's dinners, experts on the powerful icebreaking research ship were logging finds from icy waters as deep as 850 meters off the Antarctic Peninsula an area rapidly changing in fundamental ways. The recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change shows nowhere on Earth warming more quickly than this corner of Antarctica, a continent 1.5 times the size of continental USA.

The expedition forms part of the Census of Antarctic Marine Life (www.caml.aq), which has 13 upcoming voyages scheduled during International Polar Year, to be launched in Paris March 1. A project of the global Census of Marine Life (www.coml.org) collaboration, CAML is responsible for the synthesis of taxonomic data and supports the efforts of national programs the world over.

Says CAML leader Michael Stoddart of Australia: "What we learned from the Polarstern expedition is the tip of an iceberg, so to speak. Insights from this and CAML's upcoming International Polar Year voyages will shed light on how climate variations affect ice-affiliated species living in this region."

Leaving South Africa Nov 23, the research icebreaker Polarstern operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research criss-crossed the northwest Weddell Sea. The cruise included the Larsen A and B zones, an area about the size of Jamaica (or half the size of New Jersey, a third the size of Belgium). See map: '"/>

Contact: Terry Collins
terrycollins@rogers.com
416-538-8712
Census of Marine Life
25-Feb-2007


Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Related biology news :

1. Limpets reveal possible fate of cold-blooded Antarctic animals
2. Antarctic icebergs -- Hotspots of ocean life
3. Study of underground lakes in Antarctica could be critical, prof says
4. Antarctic lake experts to gather June 6, 7 in Montana
5. Scientists discover new life in the Antarctic deep sea
6. West Antarcticas subglacial plumbing system mapped from space
7. Antarctic warming to reduce animals at base of ecosystem, shift some penguin populations southward
8. UTSA researchers examine effects of global warming on Antarctic
9. Female Antarctic seals give cold shoulder to local males
10. Wanderlust -- deep-sea fauna under Antarctic ice shelf
11. ROV discovers Antarctic seafloor fauna

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/24/2014)... species of fish, according to a new study ... tested fish anti-predator behaviour. , Three-spined sticklebacks ... when exposed to additional noise, whereas no effects ... author Dr Irene Voellmy of Bristol,s School of ... environments have increased substantially during the last few ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... sticky research out of York University shows a surprisingly ... toxic grass fungus: moose saliva (yes moose saliva). ... "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte mutualism" shows that moose ... (which hosts a fungus called epichlo festucae that produces ... less toxicity. , "Plants have evolved defense mechanisms to ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... at The University of Texas Health Science Center at ... to help Harris County residents whose vision problems cannot ... with corrective lenses, many people with low vision can ... of low vision devices, such as telescopes, magnifiers and ... Iyer is using the three-year, $164,645 SightFirst grant from ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2UTHealth Dr. Bhavani Iyer awarded low vision grant 2
(Date:7/24/2014)... worldwide rely on sophisticated equipment, trained personnel, and ... areas against terrorist attacks. A revolutionary new electronic ... make their job much easier. , The groundbreaking ... Tel Aviv University ,s School of Chemistry and ... the Herzliya company Tracense, picks up the scent ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable ... approach relies on quantum dotsa kind of artificial ... A new study demonstrates that changing the coupling ... electrical impulses can help better control them. This ... as quantum information units, which would produce faster ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... to settle into equilibriuma state of unchanging balance ... of non-equilibrium conditions where new possibilities lie. Non-equilibrium ... such as temperature fluctuations, freezing and melting, or ... body temperature, airplanes to fly, and the Earth ... even though these conditions exist naturally and are ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... July 24, 2014 Research and Markets ... Genomics and Proteomics Analytical Instruments Market 2014-2018" report ... Genomics is the study of the ... of the structure and functions of proteomes or sets ... and technology. Genomics involves the mapping of genes and ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs 2New approach to form non-equilibrium structures 2Global Genomics and Proteomics Analytical Instruments Market 2014-2018: Key Vendors are Agilent, Bio-Rad , F. Hoffmann, La Roche, Illumina, PerkinElmer and Thermo Fisher Scientific 2
Cached News: