HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Better together: Bacterial endosymbionts are essential for the reproduction of a fungus

Endosymbiotic relationshipsin which one organism lives within anotherare striking examples of mutualism, and can often significantly shape the biology of the participant species. In new findings that highlight the extent to which a host organism can become dependent on its internal symbiont, researchers have identified a case in which the reproduction of a fungus has become dependent on bacteria that live within its cytoplasm. The findings, which appear online in the journal Current Biology on April 5th, are reported by Laila Partida and Christian Hertweck from the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology in Jena, Germany.

The particular partnership under study is the symbiosis of the fungus Rhizopus microsporus and Burkholderia bacteria that live within its cells. The two species effectively team up to break down young rice plants for their nutrients, causing a plant disease known as rice seedling blight. Past work from the research group had revealed that the Burkholderia bacteria play a critical role in the virulence of the fungus against rice seedlings: The bacteria produce a plant poison known as rhizoxin, which has been shown to be the causative agent in rice seedling blight.

The researchers now report a second, striking benefit conferred on the fungus by its intracellular symbiont. When the bacteria are eliminated from the fungus with antibiotic treatment, the fungal cells are no longer able to form spores, suggesting that the bacterial symbiont is in fact required for this mode of fungal reproduction. Spore formation in fungi is a universal process that allows the rapid distribution of fungal cells. The new findings appear to represent the first known case in which spore formationalso known as vegetative reproductiondepends on the presence of another organism.

The researchers found that when both organisms were brought together to re-establish the symbiosis, sporulation was restored in the fungus
'"/>

Contact: Erin Doonan
edoonan@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press
5-Apr-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Better sleep may put Huntingtons disease sufferers back on track
2. Better chemistry through living models
3. Better risk management could cut MRSA infection rates
4. Better sludge through metagenomics
5. Better beetle sought for salt cedar control
6. Coral reef resilience: Better feeders survive bleaching
7. Better model of deadly brain cancer
8. Banding together: RAS signaling of circadian output
9. Flocking together: Study shows how animal groups find their way
10. Bacterial response to oxidation studied as toxin barometer
11. Bacterial walls come tumbling down

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/23/2017)... ARMONK, N.Y. , Aug. 23, 2017  The general public,s help ... the human microbiome—the bacteria that live in and on the human body ... ... bacteria in the human microbiome, starting with the gut. The project's goal ... in disease. Photo credit: IBM ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ARMONK, N.Y. and ITHACA, N.Y. ... IBM ) and Cornell University, a leader in dairy ... combined with bioinformatics designed to help reduce the chances ... breaches. With the onset of this dairy project, Cornell ... the Consortium for Sequencing the Food Supply Chain, a ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... --  Bridge Patient Portal , an enterprise patient ... Systems , an electronic medical record solutions developer ... a partnership to build an interface between the ... products, including Centricity Practice Solution (CPS), Centricity Business ... integrations will allow healthcare delivery networks using GE ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Inc., a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, ... uses of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... International research firm Parks Associates announced today that ... TMA 2017 Annual Meeting , October 11 in Scottsdale, ... security market and how smart safety and security products impact the competitive ... Parks Associates: Smart Home Devices: Main ... "The residential security market has experienced continued ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... The Pittcon ... awards honoring scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry ... Pittcon 2018, the world’s leading conference and exposition for laboratory science, which will ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2017 , ... At its ... Dr. Christopher Stubbs, a professor in Harvard University’s Departments of Physics and Astronomy, has ... was a member of the winning team for the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: