HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Biologists find regions of rice domestication

Biologists from Washington University in St. Louis and their collaborators from Taiwan have examined the DNA sequence family trees of rice varieties and have determined that the crop was domesticated independently at least twice in various Asian locales.

Jason Londo, Washington University in Arts & Sciences biology doctoral candidate, and his adviser, Barbara A. Schaal, Ph.D., Washington University Spencer T. Olin Professor of Biology in Arts & Sciences, ran genetic tests of more than 300 types of rice, including both wild and domesticated, and found genetic markers that reveal the two major rice types grown today were first grown by humans in India and Myanmar and Thailand (Oryza sativa indica) and in areas in southern China (Oryza sativa japonica).

A paper describing the research was published June 9, 2006, in the on-line issue of the Proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Science.

"We look where the genetic signature of clusters on a haplotype tree (family tree)," explained Londo. "We chose samples across the entire range of rice and looked for DNA sequences that were shared by both wild and domesticated types. These two major groups clustered out by geography."

DNA is comprised of vast, varied combinations of chemical subunits known as base pairs. Londo, Schaal and their collaborators concentrated on finding genetic markers shared by both cultivated and wild rice types that ranged from 800 to 1,300 base pairs.

Cultivated rice has a genetic signature that defines it as cultivated, Schaal explained.

"What you do is go out and sample all the wild rice across regions and you look for that signature in the wild," said Schaal, who has done similar work with cassava and jocote, a tropical fruit. "You find that the unique signature of cultivated rice is only found in certain geographic regions. And that's how you make the determination of where it came from."

Schaal said that she was surprised and "del
'"/>

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis
12-Jun-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Biologists at Tufts University discover 1 reason why chromosomes break, often leading to cancer
2. Biologists prove critical step in membrane fusion
3. Biologists call for better choice of model organisms in evo-devo
4. Biologists produce global map of plant biodiversity
5. Biologists develop large gene dataset for rice plant
6. Biologists probe the machinery of cellular protein factories
7. American Society of Plant Biologists Annual Meeting August 5-9 in Boston
8. How healthy is that marsh? Biologists count parasites
9. Biologists estimate the value of services provided by insects
10. Biologists develop genome-wide map of miRNA-mRNA interactions
11. Biologists visualize protein interaction that may initiate viral infection

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/26/2020)... ... August 25, 2020 , ... ... solutions for drugs, biologics, cell and gene therapies, and consumer health products, today ... PEGS Boston Virtual Conference & Expo, taking place between Aug. 31 – September ...
(Date:8/21/2020)... ... August 19, 2020 , ... “How can we ... dedicated to Salivary Bioscience for more than twenty years. Together with Douglas Granger, ... " Salivary Bioscience: Foundations of Interdisciplinary Saliva Research and Applications ," and Steven ...
(Date:8/12/2020)... , ... August 12, 2020 , ... ... monitoring systems that are ideal for public health agencies of all sizes. With ... diseases and helping at-risk individuals find appropriate health care, Mosio helps public health ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/31/2020)... , ... August 29, 2020 , ... ... Animal Nutrition manufacturing capability in Wuxi, China. The new plant operation will provide ... standards and advanced technology. , “This facility will improve the flexibility of ...
(Date:8/12/2020)... ... August 11, 2020 , ... The FSHD ... Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Clinical Trial Research Network (FSHD CTRN), with consideration ... is a consortium of academic research centers in the United States and Europe ...
(Date:8/7/2020)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... August 06, 2020 , ... ... and DNA vaccine industries, announces it has closed on the purchase of greenfield ... Park in Conroe, TX and includes over 21 acres in the initial acquisition, ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... Ariz. (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2020 , ... R3 ... joint injections for only $3950. With 50 million stem cells total, patients may choose ... stem cell therapy works for arthritic joints (BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016). At R3 International, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: