HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Bird flu poses threat to international security, Illinois scholar says

In the past, when government leaders, policymakers and scholars have turned their attention to peace and security issues, the talk invariably has focused on war, arms control or anti-terrorism strategies. But Julian Palmore believes it's time to expand the scope of the conversation.

"One thing that is not talked about enough is infectious diseases," said Palmore, a mathematics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the director of the university's Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security. "Of course, the spread of AIDS has been and continues to be a major concern worldwide," he said, "but an even greater threat, with regard to international security, may well be avian influenza," or bird flu, as it's commonly called.

And while biologists, epidemiologists and other scientists are engaged in efforts to better understand how the disease is contracted and spread in animals and in humans, Palmore said world leaders and policymakers need to seriously consider the potential international security implications that would result from an avian influenza pandemic.

"Natural disasters, especially pandemics, can and do affect international security in many ways," the U. of I. professor wrote in an article titled "Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: A Clear and Present Danger to International Security," scheduled for publication in an upcoming issue of the journal Defense & Security Analysis.

"They can have disastrous effects on countries' economies, infrastructures, populations, public health and stability. As a consequence of natural disasters, governments may fail and populations may be decimated.

"Thus," Palmore writes, "planning for international security needs must take into account the effects of natural disasters.

"Since avian influenza is of utmost concern in Asia and in many other parts of the world, it is imperative that states' governments and nongovernmental organizations pa
'"/>

Contact: Melissa Mitchell, News Editor
melissa@uiuc.edu
217-333-5491
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
24-Jan-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Cat hair at home poses an allergy risk, particularly for young children
2. Replacement warhead program poses challenges for weapons complex
3. Carnegie Mellon researcher proposes development of artificial cells to fight disease
4. Malaria poses additional risks for first-time mothers
5. One-two particle punch poses greater risk for astronauts
6. Epilepsy drug poses high risk for fetal death and birth defects
7. Mouse study reveals human X-SCID gene therapy poses substantial cancer risk
8. SNM opposes new payment caps on imaging services detailed in Federal Deficit Reduction Act
9. Study proposes new method to investigate genetic hybridization
10. Respiratory syncytial virus poses a significant threat to elderly
11. Report proposes structure for national network of cord blood stem cell banks

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and ... do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations ... researchers., The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia ... honeybees appear to be resilient to these invasive pests, ... control pests in Europe, Asia and the United States ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Current Biology on April 17 have discovered ... Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species ... example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. , ... animals, Neotrogla is the only example in ... Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan. , During copulation, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system ... aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. ... have the immunological equivalent of "neighborhood police" specialized ... single organ, instead of an entire city, the body. ... St. Louis have shown that the liver, skin and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 2East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 3In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises 2Some immune cells defend only 1 organ 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... SAN JOSE, California , January 15, 2014 ... antibody-drug conjugates for cancer, today announced the appointment of Thomas ... Reynolds has over 20 years, development experience gained in the ... Genetics. "I am delighted to welcome Tom at ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 This webinar ... nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. , Regulatory ... for biosimilar drug development, however the complex nature of ... quality, safety and efficacy extremely challenging. Based on the ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA theory explains ... these latent viruses is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), and ... (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the body’s ... RA patients have high concentrations of EBV DNA in their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3
Cached News: