HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Boosting newborns' immune responses

Newborn babies have immature immune systems, making them highly vulnerable to severe infections and unable to mount an effective immune response to most vaccines, thereby frustrating efforts to protect them. Researchers at Children's Hospital Boston now believe they have found a way to enhance the immune system at birth and boost newborns' vaccine responses.

In a study published in the online edition of the journal Blood on April 25, Ofer Levy, MD, PhD and colleagues in Children's Division of Infectious Diseases show that the newborn immune system functions differently than that of adults, but that one portion of the immune response is fully functional and can be harnessed to boost immunity in these tiny infants, possibly making infections like respiratory syncytial virus, pneumococcus, pertussis, HIV and rotavirus much less of a threat.

For about a decade it's been known that people's first line of defense against infection is a group of receptors known as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the surface of certain white blood cells. Functioning like an early radar system, TLRs detect the presence of invading bacteria and viruses and trigger production of "danger signals" proteins known as cytokines that trigger other immune cells to mount a defense against the infection. People have 10 different kinds of TLRs, and Levy's team decided to examine how well they function in newborns by studying white blood cells from their cord blood.

"We found that when most Toll-like receptors are stimulated, newborns' immune responses are very impaired," Levy says. "But there was one important exception."

Levy's team, including Harvard graduate Eugenie Suter and senior author Michael Wessels, MD, showed that one TLR, known as TLR8, triggered a robust immune response in a group of white blood cells (called antigen-presenting cells) that is crucial for vaccine responses. When TLR8 was stimulated by various agents that mimic viral antigens, the cells produ
'"/>

Contact: Jamie Newton
james.newton@childrens.harvard.edu
617-355-6420
Children's Hospital Boston
25-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Boosting key milk nutrients may help lower type 2 diabetes risk
2. Boosting key milk nutrients may protect against cancer
3. Boosting brain power -- with chocolate
4. Boosting killer cells might improve breast-cancer drug
5. Boosting the BCG vaccine to beat tuberculosis
6. Boosting vitamin C in plants can help reduce smog damage
7. Boosting blood vessels with BDNF
8. Bursts of waves drive immune system soldiers toward invaders
9. A friendly foe -- Bacteria residing in the gut boost immune response to tumors
10. A stepwise retreat: How immune cells catch pathogens
11. Link between immune system and mammary gland could shed new light on breast cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/6/2019)... ... August 06, 2019 , ... A ... system that could have far-reaching implications for personalized medicine, especially when seeking treatments ... is able to predict which stem cell donors and manipulation methods might yield ...
(Date:8/4/2019)... ... ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free webinars presented by leading experts ... so be sure to register today to save your place! Participate in the discussion ... upcoming webinars: , CLINICAL OPERATIONS , August 27 – Friend or Foe? An Assessment ...
(Date:8/1/2019)... ... 31, 2019 , ... Molecular Devices, LLC, a leader in ... of its FLIPR® Penta High-Throughput Cellular Screening System. , The new FLIPR Penta ... G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, offering a new high-speed camera option capable ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/12/2019)... TOWNSHIP, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... June 12, 2019 ... ... of custom built, helium-based leak testing instruments for the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, Medical Device ... with Shanghai Zillion has been signed. The agreement will grant exclusive rights for ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 10, 2019 , ... DeepDyve and ... scientific journals to DeepDyve’s rental service for peer-reviewed journals. , IOPP’s portfolio ... more than 20 million articles, sourced from more than 15,000 journals. , “By ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... A study released today in ... are able to incorporate into human CD34+ cells, modifying their gene expression and ... increased the cells’ ability to lodge into bone marrow. This research performed by ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... May 29, ... ... our patent applications from the USPTO providing proprietary interest to our methodology, ... FOR SLEEP DISORDER DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT… extends Somnology’s IP rights including our ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: