HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Brain, behavior may have changed as social insect colonies evolved

A new study suggests that brain and behavior relationships may have changed in a profound way as larger, more complex insect societies evolved from smaller, simpler ones.

Researchers headed by Sean O'Donnell, a University of Washington associate professor of psychology, found that a key region in the brains of a primitively social paper wasp is better developed in dominant females than in subordinate ones.

"This finding, the first of its kind, contrasts with most of the prior work on social insect brain development. Earlier studies, including one of ours, were done on highly social species with large colony sizes. Among these species, age plays an important role in task performance and workers that leave the nest to forage generally have better-developed brains," he said.

"We found the opposite pattern with a primitively social wasp. Here, the stay-at-home dominant females had better brain development. In this species, direct dominance interactions among the females dictate task performance. Dominance and social interactions were more important than foraging tasks in explaining brain development."

In the new study, O'Donnell and colleagues from the University of Texas studied the brain development of the primitively social wasp Mischocyttarus mastigophorus in the tropical cloud forest near Monteverde, Costa Rica. These wasps live in colonies ranging in size from a handful to several dozen individuals where the division of labor is governed by aggression. The researchers examined an area of the insects' brain called the mushroom bodies. There is one mushroom body on top of each hemisphere of the wasp brain and these structures have a vague resemblance to the cerebrum in human and other vertebrates. The researchers were particularly interested in the calyx, a part of the mushroom body where neural connections are made.

The researchers collected and marked individuals including the queens from seven wasp nest
'"/>

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington
15-Nov-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Brain, size and gender surprises in latest fossil tying humans, apes and monkeys
2. New technology reveals seal behavior
3. A sensory organ, not the brain, differentiates male and female behavior in some mammals
4. Semiconductor membrane mimics biological behavior of ion channels
5. Researchers track snakes to study populations, behavior
6. 2007 Image of the Year: Molecular imaging relates human brain chemistry to aggressive behavior
7. Might have been key in evaluating behavior
8. Survival of the rarest: Fruit flies shed light on the evolution of behavior
9. Research suggests mens sexual behavior adapts to perceived threats
10. Good behavior, religiousness may be genetic
11. Common fungicide causes long-term changes in mating behavior

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 08, 2020 , ... Overcoming ... Therapy Regulation, An FDAnews Webinar, Wednesday, July 22, 2020 • 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. ... what is the most effective way to complete one? Will the study comply ...
(Date:7/2/2020)... , ... July 01, 2020 , ... ... its phase 1a findings of Neihulizumab, a biologic for the treatment of steroid-refractory ... 2020. Led by hemato-oncologist Dr. Paul J Martin of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... July 01, 2020 , ... ... building awareness and solutions for glioblastoma—the most common and aggressive adult brain cancer—announced ... Haile, JD, PhD. Senior Fellows are charged with supporting the organization’s initiatives and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... 29, 2020 , ... Diversified Technologies, Inc. has introduced a ... to drive Klystrons, TWTs, IOTs, and magnetrons. , DTI Radar Transmitter Systems ... a push-pull configuration; yielding fast fall time for a capacitive load. These all ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... The SDX® ... in 16 countries, has reached its 20th anniversary of worldwide use. Introduced in ... at top universities including University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Maryland, ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... “We are thrilled to deliver this new technology ... technology of its kind on the market and we were pleased that the IFT ... of traditional cultured ingredients, creating a natural way to extend the shelf life and ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... , ... July 09, 2020 ... ... company, announced today that Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has expanded the ... license allows PathSensors to move into the point-of-care diagnostic market, focusing initially ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: