HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Brown scientists map structure of DNA-doctoring protein complex

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- More than half of the human genome is made up of bits of mobile DNA, which can travel inside the body and insert genes into the chromosomes of target cells. This DNA doctoring not only shapes species over time, it also spreads antibiotic resistance and is used by bacteria that spread Lyme disease and by viruses linked to certain forms of cancer.

Last year in Nature, scientists working in the Brown University lab of Arthur Landy and the Harvard Medical School lab of Thomas Ellenberger announced they had solved the structure of "-integrase ("-Int), the protein "surgeon" that allows mobile DNA to cut into a chromosome, insert its own genes, and then sew the chromosome back up. That work was conducted using the lambda virus, which infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria and serves as a model that scientists use to understand mobile DNA.

Now scientists in the Landy lab have solved the structure of a DNA-protein complex that acts as a team of "nurses," aiding "-Int during this snip-and-solder procedure known as site-specific recombination. The structure is a three-dimensional representation of the DNA within this complex. Pictured on the cover of the Nov. 17, 2006, journal Molecular Cell, it looks like DNA dressed for a party, a double helix decked with clumps of curly, colorful ribbon. By solving this structure, scientists now know how these six proteins interact with each other and fold DNA during site-specific recombination.

"Once you know how these proteins and DNA are arranged, you have a much better sense of their function," said Xingmin Sun, a postdoctoral research associate in the Landy lab and the lead author of the journal article. "And once you know their function, you begin to see how the real work inside cells gets done."

Sun said solving the structure of the DNA-protein complex called for some creativity. Because it is a string of six proteins, the complex is too big and too flexible to an
'"/>

Contact: Wendy Lawton
Wendy_Lawton@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University
6-Dec-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Brown rot shrivels prune production in California
2. Brown cancer biologists identify major player in cell growth
3. Bones in motion: Brown scientists to create new 3-D X-ray system
4. Brown team finds crucial protein role in deadly prion spread
5. Genomic variation easier to identify with UCSD/Brown software
6. Brown and OTS will jointly manage new ILTER network secretariat
7. Brownfields may turn green with help from Michigan State research
8. NIH grants $11 million to Brown University for cancer research
9. Prions rapidly remodel good protein into bad, Brown study shows
10. Brown-Harvard team solves mobile DNAs surgical sleight-of-hand
11. Brown wins major award to improve environment, protect RI health

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/16/2019)... ... , ... Emtec, Inc.®, a global IT and management consulting ... CIO at the Healthcare Industry User Group (HIUG) Interact 2019 in ... President and Chief Information Officer, Lynne Briggs, will present Versiti’s Oracle Cloud Success ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 10, 2019 , ... Improved Pharma LLC announces the publication of ... AAPS PharmSciTech. The article was published online on April 29th, 2019. The authors are ... Xiaoming Sean Chen of Purdue University. , The article is the most recent addition ...
(Date:6/4/2019)... ... 04, 2019 , ... Molecular Devices, a global leader in ... new President of Molecular Devices, replacing Greg Milosevich who has been appointed President ... Since joining Molecular Devices in a scientific engineering role, Ms. Murphy has held ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2019)... , ... May 29, 2019 ... ... patent applications from the USPTO providing proprietary interest to our methodology, processes, ... SLEEP DISORDER DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT… extends Somnology’s IP rights including our proprietary ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... , ... May 30, 2019 , ... ... first to demonstrate an efficient delivery system for the sustained release of human ... platelet-rich plasma-based gel system was able to deliver CM into the injured kidney, ...
(Date:5/15/2019)... ... ... Milton Hershey School® has named William Charles Ballough Harding ’78 the 2019 Alumnus ... is changing lives by creating solutions to global healthcare challenges through the development of ... founders – Milton and Catherine Hershey – who always hoped for Milton Hershey School ...
(Date:5/14/2019)... ... May 14, 2019 , ... Gateway Genomics , a leading developer ... from 2,500 to 5,000 square feet. , “This past year has seen exponential ... Gateway Genomics CEO, Chris Jacob. “The SneakPeek At-Home test, which is mailed directly to ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: