HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Carnegie Mellon scientists find key HIV protein makes cell membranes bend more easily

PITTSBURGH -- Carnegie Mellon University scientists have made an important discovery that aids the understanding of why HIV enters immune cells with ease. The researchers found that after HIV docks onto a host cell, it dramatically lowers the energy required for a cell membrane to bend, making it easier for the virus to infect immune cells. The finding, in press in Biophysical Journal, will provide vital data to conduct future computer simulations of HIV dynamics to help further drug discovery and prevent deadly infections.

We found that HIV fusion peptide dramatically decreases the amount of energy needed to bend a cell-like membrane, said Stephanie Tristram-Nagle, associate research professor of biological physics at Carnegie Mellon. This helps membranes to curve, a necessary step for HIV to fuse with an immune cell as it infects it.

The Carnegie Mellon scientists used X-rays to study how HIV fusion peptide (part of a larger protein) affected the energy of manufactured lipid bilayers made to mimic normal cell membranes. Lipid bilayers provide a protective barrier for the cell against intruders, yet also contain molecules to recognize and communicate with other cells or get nutrients. Cells also communicate with one another via small, membrane-bound vesicles that contain proteins or other molecular cargo. When delivering their goods, vesicles from one cell fuse with the outermost membrane of another cell to form a series of hybrid structures called fusion intermediates.

Through evolution, viruses have also become skilled at fusing with cells to unload their genetic contents, which turn host cells into virus-producing factories. In the case of HIV, a molecule called gp120 initially helps the virus lock onto its host T cell, a cell critical for maintaining immunity. Another protein gp41 then enables HIV to penetrate a T-cell membrane. Fusion takes place specifically through a short stretch of gp41 called fusion peptide 23, or FP-23 for short
'"/>

Contact: Lauren Ward
wardle@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-7761
Carnegie Mellon University
25-Jul-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellons Peter Adams receives EPA research grant
2. Carnegie Mellons David Sholl identifies new materials
3. Carnegie Mellon University scientists identify genes activated during learning and memory
4. Carnegie Mellon University research shows how sensory-deprived brain compensates
5. Carnegie Mellon researchers urge regulators to rethink strategies for soot emission
6. Carnegie Mellon researcher proposes development of artificial cells to fight disease
7. Carnegie Mellon engineers devise new process to improve energy efficiency of ethanol production
8. DNA gets new twist: Carnegie Mellon scientists develop unique DNA nanotags
9. Carnegie Mellons Granger Morgan pens op-ed
10. Carnegie Mellon scientist plays key role in unveiling sea urchin genome
11. Carnegie Mellon study reveals that odor discrimination is linked to the timing at which neurons fire

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/24/2017)... 24, 2017 Janice Kephart , ... Identity Strategy Partners, LLP (IdSP) , today issues ... President Trump,s March 6, 2017 Executive Order: ... vetting can be instilled with greater confidence, enabling ... all refugee applications are suspended by until at ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 No two people are believed ... New York University Tandon School of Engineering and ... that partial similarities between prints are common enough ... phones and other electronic devices can be more ... lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication systems ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/29/2017)... ... May 29, 2017 , ... ... of the Year by the International Business Innovation Association and the Milken Institute ... accolades underscore what business leaders in and out of Greater Gainesville already know: ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 25, 2017 , ... Studying biological ... each occurrence. Live cell imaging using fluorescence microscopy is the perfect approach to ... fluorescence microscopy methods will be discussed, from small animal models and tissues to ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... Utah (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... the selection and implementation of CLEARAS Water Recovery’s Advanced Biological Nutrient Recovery (ABNR™) ... key component of a $24 million plant upgrade to sustainably meet current and ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Patient Monitoring and Diagnostic ... connectivity to reduce the amount of wiring in a healthcare facility and allow ... devices including infusion pumps, heart and hypertension monitoring, glucose monitoring, and other wearable ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: