HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Carnegie Mellon scientists show brain uses optimal code for sound

PITTSBURGH--Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that our ears use the most efficient way to process the sounds we hear, from babbling brooks to wailing babies. These results represent a significant advance in our understanding of how sound is encoded for transmission to the brain, according to the authors, whose work is published with an accompanying "News and Views" editorial in the Feb. 23 issue of Nature.

The research provides a new mathematical framework for understanding sound processing and suggests that our hearing is highly optimized in terms of signal coding--the process by which sounds are translated into information by our brains--for the range of sounds we experience. The same work also has far-reaching, long-term technological implications, such as providing a predictive model to vastly improve signal processing for better quality compressed digital audio files and designing brain-like codes for cochlear implants, which restore hearing to the deaf.

To achieve their results, the researchers took a radically different approach to analyzing how the brain processes sound signals. Abstracting from the neural code at the auditory nerve, they represented sound as a discrete set of time points, or a "spike code," in which acoustic components are represented only in terms of their temporal relationship with each other. That's because the intensity and basic frequency of a given feature are essentially "kernalized," or compressed mathematically, into a single spike. This is similar to a player piano roll that can reproduce any song by recording what note to press when the spike code encodes any natural sound in terms of the precise timings of the elemental acoustic features. Remarkably, when the researchers derived the optimal set of features for natural sounds, they corresponded exactly to the patterns observed by neurophysiologists in the auditory nerves.

"We've found that timing of just a sparse number of spikes
'"/>

Contact: Jonathan Potts
jpotts@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University
23-Feb-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellons Peter Adams receives EPA research grant
2. Carnegie Mellon scientists find key HIV protein makes cell membranes bend more easily
3. Carnegie Mellons David Sholl identifies new materials
4. Carnegie Mellon University scientists identify genes activated during learning and memory
5. Carnegie Mellon University research shows how sensory-deprived brain compensates
6. Carnegie Mellon researchers urge regulators to rethink strategies for soot emission
7. Carnegie Mellon researcher proposes development of artificial cells to fight disease
8. Carnegie Mellon engineers devise new process to improve energy efficiency of ethanol production
9. DNA gets new twist: Carnegie Mellon scientists develop unique DNA nanotags
10. Carnegie Mellons Granger Morgan pens op-ed
11. Carnegie Mellon scientist plays key role in unveiling sea urchin genome

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/11/2019)... ... November 11, 2019 , ... MicroGenDX, the ... a key role in the award-winning study “Next Generation Sequencing for the Diagnosis ... molecular diagnostic laboratory processed samples using Next Generation DNA Sequencing to examine the ...
(Date:11/7/2019)... ... November 07, 2019 , ... R3 Stem Cell is ... through the rest of 2019. The code to use during checkout is FIFTYOFF and ... R3 is the nation’s leader in regenerative therapies with over 12,000 successful stem cell ...
(Date:11/6/2019)... ... November 06, 2019 , ... Genomenon® ... Genomic Search Engine now includes the ability to search the entirety of the ... patients with genetic and rare diseases. , Patients, particularly those with rare diseases, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/6/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... November 06, 2019 , ... ... leaders through off-the-record collaboration and dialogue, today announces its East/West CEO ... in San Francisco. , Kicking off the week of the ...
(Date:11/5/2019)... POWAY, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... November 05, 2019 , ... Ole, a German Shepherd, was ... difficulty with stairs and jumping. Though his energy level and his willingness to play ... to veterinary surgeon Dr. Holly Mullen of VCA Emergency Animal Hospital and Referral Center ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... , ... October 31, 2019 , ... ... by pharma artificial intelligence pioneer tellic. drug360 brings tellic’s expertise in biomedical ... tool allows researchers to quickly uncover relationships between genes, diseases, variants, phenotypes, and ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... 2019 , ... CaroGen Corporation , a biotechnology company, today announced three ... Jack R Wands, MD, of Brown University , Dr. Steve Projan, PhD, ... MD, PhD, of Wayne State University, formerly a professor at Yale University School of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: