HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Cells selectively absorb short nanotubes

DNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) shorter than about 200 nanometers readily enter into human lung cells and so may pose an increased risk to health, according to scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The results of their laboratory studies appear in an upcoming issue of Advanced Materials.*

Eyed for uses ranging from electronic displays to fuel cells to water filtration, SWCNTs are tiny cylindersessentially single-sheet rolls of carbon atoms. They are many times stronger than steel and possess superlative thermal, optical and electronic properties, but safety and biocompatibility remain an open question.

"Published data citing in vitro (outside the body) toxicity are particularly inconsistent and widely disputed," writes biomaterials scientist Matthew Becker and his NIST colleagues. Public concerns surrounding the environmental, health and safety impacts of SWCNTs could derail efforts to fast track the development of nanotubes for advanced technology applications. A significant hurdle in outlining the parameters contributing to nanotube toxicity is to prepare well-defined and characterized nanotube samples, as they typically contain a distribution of lengths, diameters, twists and impurities.

The team chose to isolate the effects of nanotube length. They first adsorbed short DNA molecules onto the nanotubes because this renders them soluble in water and allows them to be sorted and separated by length. The researchers then exposed human lung fibroblasts to solutions containing unsorted nanotubes. Regardless of the concentration levels, the cells did not absorb between about one-fourth and one-third of the SWCNTs in the solutions. Further examination of the results revealed that only short nanotubes made it into the cellular interior.

In the next phase of the research, the team exposed the cells to sorted nanotubes of controlled length. They found that tubes longer than a
'"/>

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
30-Mar-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Cells take risks with their identities
2. Cells re-energize to come back from the brink of death
3. Need oxygen? Cells know how to spend and save
4. Cells use noise to make cell-fate decisions
5. Cells in the lung clear the air to prevent lung damage
6. Cells passed from mother to child during pregnancy live on and make insulin
7. Cells, dyes and videotape: Online scientific methods journal incorporates multimedia
8. Cells use mix-and-match approach to tailor regulation of genes
9. Cells in mucus from lungs of high-risk patients can predict tumor development
10. Double-trouble: Cells with duplicate genomes can trigger tumors
11. Double trouble: Cells with duplicate genomes can trigger tumors

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/26/2020)... SHANGHAI (PRWEB) , ... August 24, 2020 , ... ... approaches for the treatment of chronic inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, today announced that ... Vice President of Drug Discovery. , Dr. Canan previously served as Executive Director ...
(Date:8/21/2020)... ... August 18, 2020 , ... Sentien Biotechnologies, ... that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company’s Investigational ... the treatment of severe COVID-19. Approval of this IND allows Sentien to initiate ...
(Date:8/12/2020)... , ... August 12, 2020 , ... ... monitoring systems that are ideal for public health agencies of all sizes. With ... diseases and helping at-risk individuals find appropriate health care, Mosio helps public health ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/3/2020)... ... ... Introducing Ardent Animal Health – MediVet Biologics rebrands company and positions its platform ... Biologics since its formation in 2016, the company is relaunching itself under the Ardent ... its base of innovative therapies for osteoarthritis and cancer. , ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... G-CON Manufacturing, the ... new tagline, “BUILDING FOR LIFE.” The adoption of this taglines comes at a ... fast track capacity to provide patients with urgently needed vaccines and other lifesaving ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... Anomet Products has introduced ... materials for use with CRM, neurostimulation, vascular, and related devices. , Anomet ... design requirements, performance, and cost criteria; especially where solid wire is limited. Typical ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... eSource has long been touted as ... cover the history of eSource, the reasons it did not take off as quickly ... site source, the industry is moving towards capturing data electronically for clinical trials and ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: