HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Cells use 'noise' to make cell-fate decisions

DALLAS March 22, 2007 Electrical noise, like the crackle heard on AM radio when lightning strikes nearby, is a nuisance that wreaks havoc on electronic devices. But within cells, a similar kind of biochemical "noise" is beneficial, helping cells transform from one state to another, according to a new study led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher.

Dr. Grol Sel, assistant professor of pharmacology, said his research and that of his colleagues published today in the journal Science represents "a new paradigm," suggesting that rather than being bad for biology, cellular noise might have an important function, such as prompting stem cells to transform into a specific tissue type.

Electronic noise is an unwanted signal characteristic of all electrical circuits, typically caused by random fluctuations in the electric current passing through the components of a circuit. Similarly, within each living cell there are myriad "genetic circuits," each composed of a distinct set of biochemical reactions that contribute to some biological process. Randomness in those reactions contributes to biological noise, technically referred to as stochastic fluctuations.

"Noise in biological systems is a fact of life," said Dr. Sel, a member of the systems biology division of the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational and Systems Biology at UT Southwestern. "Even though each cell may have the same set of genes turned on the same hard-wired genetic circuit there will still be slight variations in the amount of the various proteins those genes produce, some fluctuation in the amount of each circuit component. No two cells are alike in terms of their chemical composition."

Conventional scientific thinking has been that the random nature of such fluctuations within cells interferes with the reliable operation of biological systems. However, Dr. Sel's research team hypothesized that noise in one pa
'"/>

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
Amanda.siegfried@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
22-Mar-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Cells take risks with their identities
2. Cells re-energize to come back from the brink of death
3. Need oxygen? Cells know how to spend and save
4. Cells selectively absorb short nanotubes
5. Cells in the lung clear the air to prevent lung damage
6. Cells passed from mother to child during pregnancy live on and make insulin
7. Cells, dyes and videotape: Online scientific methods journal incorporates multimedia
8. Cells use mix-and-match approach to tailor regulation of genes
9. Cells in mucus from lungs of high-risk patients can predict tumor development
10. Double-trouble: Cells with duplicate genomes can trigger tumors
11. Double trouble: Cells with duplicate genomes can trigger tumors

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/14/2019)... ... ... Dr. Julie Reck of Veterinary Medical Center of Fort Mill has recently begun ... patient, her own geriatric Australian Shepherd, Simon, was treated in June 2019 for osteoarthritis in ... his body was weak, and he struggled to play fetch and other games with his ...
(Date:8/6/2019)... ... August 06, 2019 , ... VetStem Biopharma has ... GMP manufacturing experience. In November it spun out a human regenerative medicine ... and one of the first cGMP cell manufacturing facilities in California , ...
(Date:8/6/2019)... ... August 06, 2019 , ... The demand for plant-based ... in particular quickly entered the limelight – meat alternatives. Yet, to make these ... emulsifying ingredient such as methyl cellulose. This ingredient is highly synthetic. Having a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 10, 2019 , ... Advancements ... an upcoming episode, scheduled to broadcast 4Q/2019. Check your local listings for more ... educate viewers about how its technology facilitates laboratories to improve efficiency and quality ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... ... Clinic, a national leader in opioid treatment, announced today they are partnering to ... , Mytonomy recently deployed its virtual care platform at the Mayo Clinic to ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... N.C. (PRWEB) , ... June 11, 2019 , ... ... extracellular vesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EV) are able to incorporate ... cloning ability. In a test on mice, MSC-EVs also increased the cells’ ability ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... ... For many years, the primary forms of cancer treatment have been chemotherapy, ... immuno-oncology have led to the advent of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR T) cell ... as “CARs”. The CAR enables the final product to produce chemicals in the hopes ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: