HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Cellular dumping site is not garbage after all

Cells can reuse the chemical messengers that carry genetic information to the machinery that makes proteins. Sometimes cells shuttle the messengers to storage and later reactivate them to make proteins, according to new research.

Learning how cells regulate the newly discovered "mRNA cycle" may provide insights into how the cellular machinery runs amok in diseases like cancer.

Scientists had previously thought the messenger molecules, known as mRNAs, were manufactured, used, decommissioned and then sent on a one-way journey to the garbage dump.

These cellular garbage dumps, called P-bodies, turn out to be storage depots, not landfills. After use, mRNA molecules are temporarily deactivated for storage purposes. The cell can then either destroy the mRNA or recondition pre-used mRNA so it can be put back into service if needed.

P-bodies are also involved in determining whether specific mRNAs are used to make proteins, a process called translation.

"We were surprised to find that the P-bodies were involved in regulating translation," said research team leader Roy Parker, a Regents' Professor of molecular and cellular biology at The University of Arizona in Tucson and an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2003, his lab was the first to name and describe a function for P-bodies.

Parker said of the new finding, "It suggests P-bodies have a much broader role in controlling the activities of the cell than we realized."

Parker and first author Jeff Coller report P-bodies' role in the control of translation in the Sept. 23 issue of the journal Cell. Coller, who did the research while at UA as a postdoctoral fellow with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is now an assistant professor in the Center for RNA Molecular Biology at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

The Parker lab's findings about P-bodies serving as storage depots was released online Sept. 1, 2005 and will be pu
'"/>

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona
22-Sep-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Story ideas from Molecular & Cellular Proteomics
2. Cellular message movement captured on video
3. Cellular pathway yields potential new weapon in vaccine arsenal
4. Cellular cues identified for stroke recovery
5. Cellular killer also important to memory
6. Cellular traffic backups implicated in skeletal malformations
7. Cellular antennae on algae give clues to how human cells receive signals
8. Cellular scale drug delivery from the inside out
9. Cellular power plants also fend off viruses
10. World Wildlife Fund warns against iron dumping experiment near the Galapagos Islands
11. MIT warns of dumping seafood

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Cellular dumping site not garbage after all

(Date:11/4/2014)... amount of death at the right time might actually ... research that could help in understanding animal populations, pest ... a paper in the journal Trends in Ecology ... colleagues conclude that the kind of positive population effect ... or mortality, depends on the size and developmental stage ...
(Date:11/4/2014)... , November 4, 2014   ... market growth   Fuel3D , a developer ... a funding round totaling $6.4 million (£4 million). This funding ... secured earlier this year and paves the way for the ... The funding round was led by Chimera Partners ...
(Date:11/3/2014)... of Colorado Cancer Center study published in ... Sciences describes the activity of a recently discovered ... or IL-37. It has been known to limit inflammation ... adaptive immune system: IL-37 inhibits the ability of the ... "Knowing this mechanism that underlies IL-37,s effect on the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):When less is more: Death in moderation boosts population density in nature 2Fuel3D Secures $6.4 Million in Expansion Funding 2Fuel3D Secures $6.4 Million in Expansion Funding 3PNAS: From HIV to cancer, IL-37 regulates immune system 2
(Date:11/22/2014)... 22, 2014 Respiratory therapy students ... proper management of life-like respiratory ailments using the ... . Grand Rapids-based, Michigan Instruments Inc. developers of ... of the respiratory simulation units to the pro-gram, ... Valley and Muskegon Community College are collaborating to ...
(Date:11/21/2014)...   TRU-D SmartUVC LLC and its UK partners, ... disinfection robot, TRU-D SmartUVC, at FIS 2014 in ... 26 at Stand 23. The conference, hosted by ... largest infection-related event of its kind and brings ... the leading events of its type throughout the world. This ...
(Date:11/21/2014)... 20, 2014 The California ... research organization representing leading California academic institutions, biotechnology, ... PwC US today released a report revealing ... industry growth. The trend shows a 4 percent ... California Biomedical Industry Report indicates that, while ...
(Date:11/21/2014)... 21, 2014 Why did Stephen Hawking ... Einstein so instantly recognizable? Why have they become icons ... and author Hilton Ratcliffe seeks out the answers to ... all to do with science. In " Stephen Hawking ... November 21, 2014), Ratcliffe puts it plainly: , ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Michigan Instruments Donates Two Respiratory Simulation Training and Test Lung (TTL) Devices to Grand Valley State University 2Michigan Instruments Donates Two Respiratory Simulation Training and Test Lung (TTL) Devices to Grand Valley State University 3TRU-D SmartUVC to Showcase Superbug-Killing Robot at FIS 2014 2TRU-D SmartUVC to Showcase Superbug-Killing Robot at FIS 2014 3California Healthcare Institute and PwC Report Boom in California’s Biomedical Industry 2California Healthcare Institute and PwC Report Boom in California’s Biomedical Industry 3California Healthcare Institute and PwC Report Boom in California’s Biomedical Industry 4“Stephen Hawking Smoked My Socks” Sparks Controversy in Science World 2“Stephen Hawking Smoked My Socks” Sparks Controversy in Science World 3“Stephen Hawking Smoked My Socks” Sparks Controversy in Science World 4
Cached News: