HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Chromosome deletion predicts aggressive neuroblastoma

When genes are deleted on a particular section of chromosome 11, the result is an aggressive form of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. A new study suggests that detecting this genetic deletion during the initial evaluation of children with neuroblastoma may indicate to physicians that they should recommend a more aggressive regimen of chemotherapy to fight the cancer.

Edward F. Attiyeh, M.D., a pediatric oncology fellow at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, reported on a study of 915 patients in a presentation today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. The patients were children with primary neuroblastoma treated at Children's Oncology Group (COG) centers. The COG is a National Institutes of Health-funded multicenter clinical research organization that supports clinical trials for pediatric cancer patients.

Neuroblastoma, which accounts for 10 percent of all pediatric cancers, often occurs as a solid tumor in a child's abdomen or chest. Some cases of neuroblastoma are low risk, and resolve after surgeons remove the tumor. Other cases are more aggressive, and are more likely to resist initial treatment, or to cause a relapse. Identifying the correct risk level allows doctors to treat aggressive cancers appropriately, while not subjecting children with low-risk cancer to overtreatment.

Oncologists know that amplification, an abnormal increase in the number of copies, of a cancer-causing gene called MYCN heralds a high-risk, aggressive cancer. However, a significant number of neuroblastomas are aggressive without having amplified MYCN. "The deletion of genetic material on chromosome 11 may account for a significant percentage of these high-risk neuroblastomas," said Dr. Attiyeh.

It is unknown what causes the deletion of genes on chromosome 11, at a location designated chromosome 11q23. However, the loss of material at that site apparently removes the protective effect of a tumor suppress
'"/>

Contact: John Ascenzi
Ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
16-May-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Chromosome glue repairs damaged DNA
2. Chromosome rearrangements not as random as believed
3. Chromosome regions containing genes related to alcohol addiction affect drinking behavior in smokers
4. Chromosome four contains genes that affect drinking behaviors in smokers
5. Chromosome 16 publication fulfills DOEs human genome commitment
6. Teens with deletion syndrome confirm genes role in psychosis
7. Gene predicts better outcome as cortex normalizes in teens with ADHD
8. Marker predicts pancreatic cancer outcome after surgery, Jefferson surgeon finds
9. Major study predicts grim future for Europes seas
10. FDG-PET imaging clearly predicts lung cancer patients response to chemotherapy
11. NASA predicts nongreen plants on other planets

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Chromosome deletion predicts aggressive neuroblastoma

(Date:8/20/2014)... Aug. 20, 2014 George E. Fox, a John and ... of Houston (UH), was named a fellow in the International ... , Fox is one of four members two ... chosen as fellows in 2014. Fellows are elected every ... more than 500 members from more than 20 countries, the ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... of 158 pregnant teenagers in Rochester, NY, nearly half ... of ice, cornstarch, vacuum dust, baby powder and soap, ... , Moreover, such teens had significantly lower iron levels ... substances. , Pregnant teens, regardless of pica, are at ... iron deficiency and anemia. Low iron in pregnant teens ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University ... the gene that encodes BCR-ABL, the unregulated enzyme driving ... the American Cancer Society, nearly 6,000 new cases of ... in use, called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), target BCR-ABL ... not cure CML but control it in a way ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):UH professor named fellow by International Astrobiology Society 2Pica in pregnant teens linked to low iron 2Blueprint for next generation of chronic myeloid leukemia treatment 2
(Date:8/20/2014)... , Aug. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- A case ... collaboration between the school,s bioengineering department and the ... the Intel® Software Academic Program, UCSD,s research focuses ... the human body.  Photo - ... exhibits the work of Dr. Todd P. ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... 2014 Shimadzu Scientific Instruments has ... and Nexera-i, adding to the company’s extensive line-up ... an intuitive operating environment, and full automation, the ... workflow for conventional to ultra-high-speed analysis. ... intelligent design so users can begin building the ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... (PRWEB) August 19, 2014 Robin Williams’ ... disease can take on an individual. Symptoms range ... facial expression, problems swallowing and severe depression. Parkinson’s ... dying off of dopamine producing neurons of the brain. ... a disease that slowly and progressively gets worse, they ...
(Date:8/19/2014)... , Aug. 19, 2014   Synthetic ... company developing novel anti-infective biologic and drug programs ... diseases, announced today that its novel C. ... the 54 th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial ... Washington D.C. Synthetic ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Intel and University of San Diego Bioengineering Department Release Case Study on Health Sciences Research 2Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 2Shimadzu’s New i-Series Integrated Liquid Chromatography Systems Provide Laboratories Wider Range of Analytical Capabilities 3As We Mourn Robin Williams’ Passing, His Death Sheds Light on Patients Struggling with Parkinson’s Disease 2As We Mourn Robin Williams’ Passing, His Death Sheds Light on Patients Struggling with Parkinson’s Disease 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 2Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Late-Breaking Poster Presentation for C. difficile Program at 54th ICAAC 4
Cached News: