HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Cost-effectiveness of treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

Researchers have made predictions as to how the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in Peru might progress over the next 30 years, depending on what measures are used to fight it. They considered the five different approaches to treating drug-resistant TB that are open to the Peruvian health authorities.

TB is a growing problem worldwide. Most cases can be treated effectively with a standard treatment (known as 'DOTS', which stands for 'Directly Observed Therapy Short-Course') but an increasing number of cases are resistant to all the various 'first-line' treatment drugs; this is known as multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. MDR-TB must be treated with 'second-line' drugs. There are several different options; for example, doctors could give second-line drugs whenever a first attempt at treatment has failed, or only use these drugs in cases where tests have confirmed MDR-TB to be the problem. MDR-TB cases could all be given the same standard treatment or, based on tests, each could have 'individualized' treatment.

The researchers used a method called 'modelling'. They performed calculations based on information already available about TB in Peru, where there are 120 new TB infections per 100,000 people every year and 4.5% of existing cases have MDR-TB. They concluded that use of second-line drugs would be cost-effective for Peru and that, despite the extra costs of individualized treatment, this is the best option. The results will be of interest in other developing countries. The researchers say, "In other settings, the attractiveness of strategies using second-line drugs will depend on TB incidence, MDR burden, and the available budget, but simulation results suggest that individualized regimens would be cost-effective in a wide range of situations". They also stress it is important for the standard first-line DOTS treatment to be made widely available.


'"/>

Contact: Andrew Hyde
ahyde@plos.org
44-122-346-3330
Public Library of Science
3-Jul-2006


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Cost-effectiveness study of three antimalarial drug combinations in Tanzania
2. Brain blood flow gives clues to treating depression
3. New strategy for treating allergic disorders
4. Developer of new method for treating bone defects wins WPI Entrepreneurship Award
5. UCF nanoparticle offers promise for treating glaucoma
6. Cisplatin is more effective than carboplatin for treating nonsmall cell lung cancer
7. 8 plants from South Africa may hold potential for treating high blood pressure
8. Arctic ice retreating more quickly than computer models project
9. Nanotechnology offers hope for treating spinal cord injuries, diabetes and Parkinsons disease
10. Discovery in plants suggests entirely new approach to treating human cancers
11. Preventing and treating lung cancer -- ESMO explores collaboration to fight cancer on all fronts

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/29/2014)... from scientists at the University of Kent has shown ... are regulated a breakthrough that could have a ... from Kent,s School of Biosciences uncovered the mechanism whereby ... known as actin filaments are ,fine-tuned, to ... filaments appear to completely stable, providing a framework for ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... affects 1 in 100,000 people characterized by a loss ... remains unknown, a new study by a team of researchers ... Germany and other European institutions confirms for the first time ... 6 July in Nature Genetics , is an important ... a sphincter in the lower esophagus opens, allowing food to ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... Amundsen reached the South Pole in 1911, but new ... any human. , Using data from 16 ice cores ... including the South Pole, a group led by Joe ... Nevada, created the most accurate and precise reconstruction to ... new record, described in an article published today in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Mysterious esophagus disease is autoimmune after all 2Lead pollution beat explorers to South Pole, persists today 2Lead pollution beat explorers to South Pole, persists today 3
(Date:7/29/2014)... , July 29, 2014 ... surgical equipment market (types, applications and geography) - Size, ... Report, Opportunities, Segmentation and Forecast, 2013 - 2020", suggests ... reach $12.1 billion by 2020 registering a CAGR of ... the breakthrough achieved by the electro surgical devices in ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... Hershey, PA & Rockville, MD (PRWEB) July 29, ... Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. (ITI), a vaccine pioneer in ... the financial services firm Newport Coast Securities, Inc. ... , ITI is commercializing LAMP-vax technology, a breakthrough ... $25B+ vaccines and immunotherapy market. The company exclusively ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... DisasterTalk is a texting app which allows ... masts or other transmitters are down. The app can transmit ... the need for any Wi-Fi, and can also use a ... app has launched as a housing report finds ... risk of being affected by natural disasters. With the risk ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... California (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 The ... is a next generation approach to robotics. What sets ... is patent pending technology that allows them to communicate, ... all wirelessly over the internet. , “The invention is ... giving the little Droidles a life of their own, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Global Surgical Equipment Market is expected to reach $12.1 billion by 2020 - Allied Market Research 2Global Surgical Equipment Market is expected to reach $12.1 billion by 2020 - Allied Market Research 3Immunomic Therapeutics Engages Newport Coast Securities, Inc. 2Immunomic Therapeutics Engages Newport Coast Securities, Inc. 3DisasterTalk App Could Save Lives as Report Reveals 8% of US Homes at Very High Risk of Natural Disaster 2Droidles, the Social Network of Robots and Open Source Platform for the Internet of Things, Launches for Crowd Funding on IndieGoGo.com 2
Cached News: