HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Current technology for brain cooling unlikely to help trauma patients

Attempts to cool the brain to reduce injury from stroke and other head trauma may face a significant obstacle: current cooling devices can't penetrate very deeply into the brain.

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis used rats to validate a "cold shielding" effect of blood flow that they previously predicted theoretically. The shielding effect, created by large quantities of warm blood that continually perfuse brain tissue, prevents a drop in temperatures around the head from penetrating beyond a certain depth in the brain.

Many ongoing clinical trials try to reduce brain temperatures through cooling units incorporated into hats or other devices that surround the head. However, the new findings, published online this month in the Journal of Applied Physiology, suggest in most patients such techniques will be unable to defeat the natural temperature regulation built into the brain via the blood system.

"In adult humans, the characteristic length that this kind of cold assault appears to penetrate is approximately a tenth of an inch, leaving the temperature of approximately 6 inches of brain tissue unchanged," says senior author Dmitriy Yablonskiy, Ph.D., professor of radiology at the School of Medicine and of physics in Arts and Sciences. "Our findings suggest that the reason trials of this kind have so far produced inconsistent results is because we're not cooling enough of the brain."

The amount of blood flowing through brain tissue determines the extent of the shielding effect. Young children, infants and in particular newborns have smaller brains with lower blood flow and may be more susceptible to a cooling unit around the head. But for other patients, Yablonskiy asserts, a different approach is needed.

Cold slows down the rate of chemical reactions, potentially slowing the reactions that cause permanent injury in patients with stroke and other head trauma. Attempts to create this
'"/>

Contact: Michael Purdy
purdym@wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine
4-Aug-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Currents could disrupt ocean food chain
2. Current human embryonic stem cell lines contaminated UCSD/Salk team finds
3. AFCYBER holds science and technology symposium
4. New technology reveals seal behavior
5. Nanotechnology helps scientists make bendy sensors for hydrogen vehicles
6. FDA Nanotechnology Task Force takes positive step forward
7. Liverpool amongst first in UK to install unique DNA sequencing technology
8. EPA foregoes opportunity to improve nanotechnology oversight
9. The Cancer Genome Atlas awards funds for technology development
10. Autism theory put to the test with new technology
11. Nanotechnology, medicine and bioethics

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/20/2019)... ... June 19, 2019 , ... The ... Diseases Society of America Foundation, and the possibly millions of dollars of “high ... agents in AD, are a “welcome affirmation” of the need to investigate more ...
(Date:6/16/2019)... ... June 14, 2019 , ... Emtec, Inc.®, ... deliver a joint presentation with Versiti’s CIO at the Healthcare Industry User ... Shingle Creek Resort. , Versiti Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Lynne Briggs, ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 12, 2019 , ... With a rapidly ... to leverage the Geneious Biologics platform as a premium hub for bioinformatics and ... Abveris, says: “The Geneious team has done an excellent job accommodating our specific ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/15/2019)... ... May 15, 2019 , ... Milton Hershey School® has named William ... work within the biomedical industry, where he is changing lives by creating solutions to ... “William Harding epitomizes the vision of our founders – Milton and Catherine Hershey – ...
(Date:5/14/2019)... , ... May 14, 2019 , ... Gateway Genomics ... effectively doubling its space from 2,500 to 5,000 square feet. , “This past ... DNA tests ,” says Gateway Genomics CEO, Chris Jacob. “The SneakPeek At-Home test, which ...
(Date:5/4/2019)... , ... May 03, 2019 , ... ... the President of the Dakila Pesquisas Association, the scientist and ufologist Urandir Fernandes ... in Brasília (DF). Urandir detailed the results of some research carried out by ...
(Date:5/2/2019)... ... 30, 2019 , ... The centuries old practice of brewing beer thrives today ... breweries, and even home brewing clubs scattered across the nation. , But proper ... mastered can produce a superb product. Students at South Dakota School of Mines ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: