HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Dartmouth professor makes case for ethically universal stem cell lines

HANOVER, NH -- Human embryonic stem cells (hESC), those very young cells that are a biological blank slate, have the potential to become more specialized, contributing to the workings of a wide variety of organs and tissues. Their potential to treat diseases such as Parkinsons is slow to be realized because of the ongoing ethical debate over harvesting hESCs, a process called deriving hESC lines. Additionally, its a politically charged issue in the U.S. because it involves federal funding for research.

A recently published paper by Dartmouth Professor Ronald M. Green examines the moral questions and the scientific feasibility of deriving hESC lines in ways that avoid destroying living human embryos. The paper, published in the June 2007 issue of Nature Reviews Genetics, considers six current approaches: altered nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, single-blastomere biopsy, somatic-cell dedifferentiation, the use of dead embryos, and the use of abnormal embryos. Greens goal, as stated in the paper, is to greatly accelerate hESC research that is closer to being universally acceptable.

I think we can pursue hESC research and also respect the sensitivities of our fellow citizens. Its not impossible to do both, says Green, the Eunice and Julian Cohen Professor for the Study of Ethics and Human Values, and the faculty director of the Dartmouth Ethics Institute. In addition to resolving current debates, he argues, these alternatives can make possible hESC lines that are ethically universal. These would be analogous to the universal O-type blood group: lines that could be used by anyone regardless of their ethical views on the moral status of the embryo.

Green, who is also an adjunct professor of community and family medicine at the Dartmouth Medical School, says, The six approaches differ in technique, most directly in how the blastocyst is created. The blastocyst, where hESCs are found, is the three- to five-day-old embryo that has not yet
'"/>

Contact: Sue Knapp
sue.knapp@dartmouth.edu
603-646-3661
Dartmouth College
7-Jun-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Plants that produce more vitamin C may result from UCLA-Dartmouth discovery
2. Vitamin extends life in yeast, Dartmouth Medical School researchers find
3. Dartmouth researchers find that arsenic triggers unique mechanism in rare leukemia
4. Dartmouth researchers find that low doses of arsenic have broad impact on hormone activity
5. Dartmouth researchers identify a gene that enhances muscle performance
6. Dartmouth study contributes to research addressing malnutrition and iron deficiency
7. Genetic variation impacts aspirins effectiveness in preventing colon cancer, Dartmouth study finds
8. Dartmouth researchers find a neural signature of bilingualism
9. Dartmouth and GlycoFi report full humanization of therapeutic proteins from yeast
10. GlycoFi and Dartmouth report full humanization of yeast glycosylation pathway in Science
11. Dartmouth researchers find key player in immune system regulation

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/29/2014)... science, Clment Vidal takes on big philosophical questions in ... our universe have a beginning and an end, or ... What is the role of intelligent life, if any, ... philosophical rigor, the book presents an evolutionary worldview where ... but may well be the key to unlocking the ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting ... on. NASA,s Aqua satellite collected this natural-color image ... July 26, 2014. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS,s ... smoke are drifting northward in this image. Smoke ... Fire has caused power outages in the area and ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) ... five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National ... the National Institutes of Health to study the ... The grant, which renews a previous $12 million ... for the research by studying chlamydial and gonorrheal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Book: 'The Beginning and the End' 2University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry and Medicine receive NIH grant 2University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry and Medicine receive NIH grant 3University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry and Medicine receive NIH grant 4
(Date:7/29/2014)... team of researchers has created a new way ... textures. These surfaces, made by self-assembly of carbon ... including controllable mechanical stiffness and strength, or ... direction. , "We have demonstrated that mechanical forces ... complex three-dimensional microstructures, and that we can independently ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... biofuels are a viable solution to the dilemma of climate ... very cheap, this is affecting the biofuels market in North ... be in comparison to natural gas. This, in conjunction ... renewable energy developers to get the economics to work and ... companies have shifted their focused within renewable energy. ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... SANTA CLARA, Calif. , July 29, 2014 ... research services agreement with FORMA Therapeutics, Inc., to ... capabilities and proprietary fragment-based lead discovery platform for ... are really excited about the opportunity to work ... the fields of epigenetics and protein homeostasis. FORMA ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... July 29, 2014  ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) is ... treatment of infectious diseases as well as nutraceuticals. ... prevention of pathologies like cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer,s disease ... ImmunoClin Corporation will complete the strategic relocation of ... , a key center of North American ...
Breaking Biology Technology:A new way to make microstructured surfaces 2Renewable Waste Intelligence: Could Renewable Chemicals Be the Future for the Renewable Energy Industry? 2Nanosyn Announces Expanded Partnership With FORMA Therapeutics 2ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 2ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 3
Cached News: