HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Dengue and other hemorrhagic fevers: Towards a first potential treatment

Globally, 60 to 100 million people are hit by Dengue, a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. The most severe form of this disease, which causes blood loss, can lead to a fatal shock-like state (Dengue Shock Syndrome) with or without associated haemorrhage, and is currently increasing in tropical countries. The pathological mechanisms of Dengue are still unknown and it has not been possible to produce any treatment or vaccine. The only current prevention method is vector control.

This context brought IRD immunology and virology specialists and their research partners (1) to focus on these little-known biological mechanisms that are set into operation on infection by the virus, responsible for increasing the permeability of vascular wall endothelial cells and hence blood loss. The researchers found evidence of the role played by particular enzymes, metalloproteinases, in the occurrence of this leakage.

Low concentrations of these enzymes are present naturally in the organism, and they are involved in the reconfiguration of organ tissues during human embryonic development or tissue repair, but also in the development of certain cancers. They attack specifically the intercellular cement that binds the vascular walls. The research team demonstrated, in vitro, that Dengue-virus infection of certain targeted cells of the immune system (the dendritic cells) triggered an inflammatory reaction, stimulating these same target cells to overproduce metalloproteinases (gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9) and secrete them into the cellular supernatant (2). The quantity of enzyme produced therefore appears to be proportional to the concentration of viral particles present.

To verify that the metalloproteinases were the only agents responsible for the increased vascular permeability, the researchers performed tests on cell cultures of endothelial tissue, of the same type as that of the blood vessel walls. The supernatant
'"/>

Contact: Guillaume-Signoret Marie
fichesactu@paris.ird.fr
33-014-803-7607
Institut de Recherche Pour le Dveloppement
22-Dec-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Dengue virus reveals its circular secret
2. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
3. Pregnant mothers join search for causes of autism
4. 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
5. Innovative research technique reveals another natural wonder in Yellowstone Park
6. Mother-of-pearl -- Classic beauty and remarkable strength
7. The fisherman is a predator like any other
8. Nanoparticles carry chemotherapy drug deeper into solid tumors
9. A faster way to recover from chemotherapy and marrow transplant
10. Another sexual attraction is possible ...
11. Study suggests other causes for childhood brain aneurysms

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/24/2014)... smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, ... heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds and ... study finds that it is technically and economically feasible ... by clean, renewable energy. Published in Energy , ... and reliable energy supply in California that could create ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on ... product, creating the final flavor according to research published ... Environmental Microbiology . This is the first time investigators ... , Many sake makers inoculate with both bacteria ... the University of California, Davis, but he and his ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Iyer, O.D., a low vision specialist at The University ... School, has been awarded a grant to help Harris ... eyeglasses, medication or surgery. , Even with corrective lenses, ... best. However, there are a variety of low vision ... help offset their vision loss. , Iyer is using ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 2Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 3Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 4The microbes make the sake brewery 2UTHealth Dr. Bhavani Iyer awarded low vision grant 2
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014  ECC West Africa, LLC (ECC) signed ... with University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan Board of Management ... finance, design, construct, and operate and maintain a new, ... . Under the first of the 4-phase project, ECC ... funding applications. UCH Ibadan intends to finance and develop ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... A research team led by group leader Yung-Eun ... technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which ... secondary batteries and fuel cells. Yung-Eun Sung is ... Nanoparticle Research at Institute for Basic Science* (IBS) ... , This achievement has great significance with regards ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... at the University of Delaware, is known worldwide ... engineering, environmental sustainability and electronics. , His early ... a well-defined, crystalline structure. At the atomic scale, ... zeolites can separate molecules with size differences of ... a nanometer), making them useful to the chemical ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... , July 24, 2014 Research ... "Global Cell Culture Market 2014-2018" report to ... Cell culture is the in vitro growth ... as research, cell studies, and biopharmaceutical production. Cell culture ... production. Cell culture instruments and cell culture consumables are ...
Breaking Biology Technology:ECC Signs a Contract for the Finance, Design, and Construction of a Premier Cancer Institute in Ibadan, Nigeria 2University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites 2Global Cell Culture Market 2014-2018: Key Vendors are Becton, Dickinson and Co, EMD, GE Healthcare, Lonza Group, Sigma Aldrich and Thermo Fisher Scientific 2
Cached News: