HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Diabetics susceptible to compromised cardiovascular function from high levels of air pollution

Boston, MA - Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and colleagues assessed the effect of high air pollution levels, specifically emissions from coal-burning power plants and diesel vehicles, on Boston-area adults with diabetes. Their study found that on days when air pollution levels were high, adults with diabetes were at higher risk for cardiovascular problems due to impairments in blood vessel function. These results show a biological mechanism linking particulate pollution and impaired cardiovascular function. The findings appear in the June 7, 2005 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

The study compared the effect of pollution on 270 greater Boston residents divided into two groups; one positively diagnosed with either type I or type II diabetes and the other comprised of non-diabetic individuals but with a family history of diabetes. To assess blood vessel functioning, an ultrasound device was used to measure how well the participants' arteries were able to expand in response to increased blood flow through the arm.

Impaired blood vessel function is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis, heart attacks, stroke, other serious cardiovascular problems and death. On days with either high levels of sulfate particles from power plants or black carbon particles from automobile traffic, the arteries of the diabetics in the study were less able to expand in response to blood flow.

Specifically, on days when sulfate pollution was elevated the researchers found an 11 percent decrease in vascular reactivity among diabetic participants. On days when black carbon concentrations were elevated, diabetic study participants had a 13 percent decrease in vascular reactivity. In comparison, non-diabetics were not affected.

Beginning in the early 1990s researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health showed that particles in the air, predominantly from coal-burning power plants and
'"/>

Contact: Kevin C. Myron
kmyron@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-3952
Harvard School of Public Health
7-Jun-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Age is more than a number -- in barn owls, it reveals how susceptible one is to climate change
2. Eat less, weigh more? Enzyme makes lean mice susceptible to dietary fat
3. Nearly a quarter of children are especially susceptible to respiratory illness if they are exposed to second-hand smoke
4. Scientists discover a new disease-causing bacterium in an immune-compromised patient
5. Nitric oxide: Key to cardiovascular and pulmonary function and drug effectiveness
6. FSU researchers award will fund study into cardiovascular grafts
7. Study fails to verify gene variations as risk factors for certain cardiovascular problems
8. Women in polluted areas at higher risk of cardiovascular disease
9. Researchers warn milk eliminates cardiovascular health benefits of tea
10. New test may identify cardiovascular disease earlier
11. Link identified between age, cardiovascular disease

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/24/2014)... 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- The Geneva Healthcare Suite, an innovative ... cut emergency room wait times by an average of ... Center, according to a recent study published in the ... using the suite to access data from incoming patients, ... "Using Geneva,s technology platform we have been able ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... on average over a 35 year period in which ... impact of humans on declining animal numbers. This decline ... insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms bring to our ... decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration and human health. ... led by UCL, Stanford and UCSB, focused on the ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... a smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent ... on heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds ... Stanford study finds that it is technically and economically ... powered by clean, renewable energy. Published in Energy ... inexpensive and reliable energy supply in California that could ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):UC San Diego Medical Center Cuts Average ER Wait Time by 92 Minutes using the Geneva Healthcare Suite 2UC San Diego Medical Center Cuts Average ER Wait Time by 92 Minutes using the Geneva Healthcare Suite 3Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 3Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 2Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 3Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 4
(Date:7/24/2014)... (PRWEB) July 24, 2014 Gain ... Global Supply Chain of the biotech industry. Nominations ... Innovation Awards, brought to you by the ... organization of supply chain management professionals for the ... to stakeholders of the Biotech industry – Manufacturers, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... on sophisticated equipment, trained personnel, and detection dogs ... terrorist attacks. A revolutionary new electronic chip with ... job much easier. , The groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor, ... University ,s School of Chemistry and Center for ... company Tracense, picks up the scent of explosives ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... synthetic processes prefer to settle into equilibriuma state ... within the realm of non-equilibrium conditions where new ... energy and phases, such as temperature fluctuations, freezing ... to regulate their body temperature, airplanes to fly, ... , But even though these conditions exist ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... July 24, 2014 SRI International has been ... National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part ... development of potential therapies for HIV infection and AIDS. ... HIV and AIDS and the complications and opportunistic infections ... preventing sexual transmission of HIV. According ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Call for Submission: BSMA’s Supply Chain Management Innovation Awards 2Call for Submission: BSMA’s Supply Chain Management Innovation Awards 3Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs 2New approach to form non-equilibrium structures 2National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Awards SRI International Contract to Study New Therapies for HIV and AIDS 2National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Awards SRI International Contract to Study New Therapies for HIV and AIDS 3
Cached News: