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'Dipstick' test could reduce risk of food poisoning by rapidly detecting spoilage

CHICAGO, March 25 Chemists at the University of South Carolina are developing a consumer test kit that people can use to quickly and accurately determine if food products are spoiled or safe to eat.

Described today at the 233rd national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the new diagnostic test, which researchers describe as a disposable dipstick, is capable of rapidly (less than 5 minutes) detecting the presence of chemicals formed by disease-causing bacteria. In preliminary studies, the test had a 90 percent accuracy rate, the researchers say. The test could help avoid illnesses and even deaths caused by food poisoning, which afflicts several million people each year in the United States alone.

The dipstick test is still in development but could be on store shelves in two to three years, says study leader John J. Lavigne, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the schools Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, located in Columbia, S.C.

Theres no other test like this targeting the consumer market right now that I am aware of, says Lavigne. It has the potential to change the way individual diners think about the quality of their food and greatly impact public health.

Lavigne envisions that consumers will be able to carry the dipsticks with them and use them anywhere, including homes and restaurants.

The new test relies on the detection of a class of chemicals called nonvolatile biogenic amines. These compounds are generated during the bacterial decay of food proteins and are an indirect measurement of the extent of food spoilage. Lavigne and his associates developed special polymers that change color in the presence of these biogenic amines. In lab studies, they tested these polymer biosensors against a variety of fish samples, including fresh salmon, fresh tuna and canned tuna.

The polymers change color in the presence of increasing levels of these biogenic amines to indicate degrees of food sp
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