HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Einstein scientists discover how protein crucial for motion is synthesised at the right place in the cell

Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the German Cancer Research Institute have shown how protein synthesis is targeted to certain regions of a cell--a process crucial for the cellular motility that governs nerve growth, wound healing and cancer metastasis. Their study appears in the November 24 issue of the journal Nature.

Led by Drs. Robert Singer and Dr Stefan Huettelmaier, the research team focused on migrating fibroblast cells important in wound healing. To move towards a wound, these cells manufacture the protein actin, which polymerizes into long filaments that push the cell's membrane outward to form protrusions.

The team's previous work showed how newly formed actin messenger RNA molecules find their way to the cell's periphery: A protein called ZBP1 binds to the messenger RNA and "escorts" it out of the fibroblast nucleus and into the cytoplasm. On reaching the cell's periphery, the messenger RNA is translated into actin protein responsible for cell motility.

This new study reveals another key role for ZBP1: Not only does ZBP1 bind to actin messenger RNA and guide it to the cell's periphery, but it also helps regulate where in the cell the messenger RNA is translated into actin.

"The ZBP1 bound to actin's messenger RNA acts like a lock to prevent it from being translated into protein before reaching its destination," explains Dr. Singer. "On arriving at the cell periphery, the messenger RNA/ZBP1 complex encounters an enzyme, the protein kinase Src, which is active only in that part of the cell. Src adds a phosphate group to ZBP1 close to where it binds to messenger RNA, and this phosphorylation reaction detaches ZBP1 from the actin messenger RNA--unlocking the messenger RNA so it can now be translated into the actin protein that makes cell movement possible."

Understanding how actin synthesis is spatially regulated in motile cells could lead to new cancer therapies. "In cancer," says Dr. Singer, "we know t
'"/>

Contact: Karen Gardner
kgardner@aecom.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
23-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. In a first, Einstein scientists discover the dynamics of transcription in living mammalian cells
2. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
3. Einstein researchers discover radiation-eating fungi
4. Einsteins Dr. Vern Schramm elected to the National Academy of Sciences
5. Einstein researchers discover how a key dietary vitamin is absorbed
6. NCI funds Einstein and U. Albany NanoCollege to make worlds smallest cancer detection device
7. Team at CNSE and Einstein receive grant to develop worlds smallest cancer detection device
8. Einstein researchers demonstrate a novel approach to treating AIDS
9. Einsteins Dr. E. Richard Stanley receives 2006 E. Donnall Thomas Prize
10. Einstein researchers find key to unlocking worlds deadliest malaria parasite
11. Findings by Einstein scientists reveal possible strategy against obesity, diabetes and infertility

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2017)... -- Veratad Technologies, LLC ( www.veratad.com ), an innovative and ... solutions, announced today they will participate as a sponsor ... May 17, 2017, in Washington D.C.,s ... Identity impacts the lives of billions of ... digital world, defining identity is critical to nearly every ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... SINGAPORE , May 5, 2017 ... has just announced a new breakthrough in biometric ... that exploits quantum mechanical properties to perform ... new smart semiconductor material created by Ram Group ... across finance, entertainment, transportation, supply chains and security. ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017 ... its vendor landscape is marked by the presence of ... is however held by five major players - 3M ... these companies accounted for nearly 61% of the global ... leading companies in the global military biometrics market boast ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... The CRISPR-Cas9 system ... experiments and avoiding the use of exogenous expression plasmids. The simplicity of programming ... systematic gain-of-function studies. , This complement to loss-of-function studies, such as with ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is back for ... June 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and former FDA ... board directors and government officials from around the world to address key issues in ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... -- VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider of patient support solutions, has ... (CNE) network, which will launch this week. The VMS CNEs ... professionals to enhance the patient care experience by delivering peer-to-peer ... care professionals to help women who have been diagnosed and ... ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the evolving ... those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , That ... countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to take ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: