HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Engineer ramps up protein production, develops versatile viral spheres

Scientists are taking the amazing protein-making parts out of cells and putting them into systems to mass-produce designer proteins for a wide variety of medical uses. At the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Sept. 13 in San Francisco, Stanford engineering Professor James Swartz will discuss advances in such "cell-free" protein synthesis, including production of versatile, nanoscale viral spheres that can act as delivery trucks for a new class of potentially more effective vaccines.

"We want to make proteins that are important as pharmaceuticals and for other uses," says Swartz, a professor of chemical engineering and bioengineering at Stanford. "If we could produce them with great efficiency and at very low cost, that would be an important step."

He emphasizes: "A living cell has many unique demands for energy, such as for the synthesis of many types of molecules. We would like to focus all of those metabolic resources just on making our product."

Whole cells can be difficult for researchers to use for making custom proteins because they don't always tolerate the chemical changes a researcher needs to impose to make a specific product. Cell-free techniques, in contrast, can be more robust because they use just the protein-making machinery of cells. To harvest just the parts he needs, Swartz literally rips cells open by applying intense shear forces.

For one of his more recent contributions to developing cell-free techniques, Swartz will receive the Gaden Award at the ACS meeting. The award is named for Elmer L. Gaden, the founding editor of the journal Biotechnology & Bioengineering, and recognizes the most outstanding paper of the year in that journal. Swartz, who holds the Leland T. Edwards Professorship in the School of Engineering at Stanford, will receive the award for a paper showing for the first time how glucose, the abundant sugar produced by photosynthesis and used in many organisms, can be us
'"/>

Contact: David Orenstein
davidjo@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford University
13-Sep-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Wiley extends publishing partnership with the American Institute of Chemical Engineers
2. Engineered blood vessels function like native tissue
3. Engineered protein effective against Staphylococcus aureus toxin
4. Engineering professor receives prestigious NSF Career Award
5. 4th International Conference on Ethical Issues in Biomedical Engineering
6. AEA, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering to partner on CIRCA 07
7. Engineering the heart piece by piece
8. 2007 Amgen Biochemical Engineering Award
9. Engineers develop process to recycle unused paint by blending it into common plastics
10. National panel led by LSU Chancellor releases report on Corps of Engineers
11. Enzyme Engineering XIX

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/1/2020)... SOMERSET, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... July 01, 2020 ... ... today announced that it had completed the purchase of Teva-Takeda Pharmaceuticals’ packaging facility ... with the company’s existing Japanese clinical supply facility located in Kakegawa, the new ...
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 25, 2020 , ... ... today announced that it has entered into a multi-year contract with Merus ... support their translational and clinical research strategy to discover and develop ground-breaking ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2020 , ... ... cloud-based enterprise software and software-driven clinical data services that accelerate drug development, is ... low-dose selinexor, an XPO1 inhibitor, in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This is ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... , ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... Catalent, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions ... that they have entered into a strategic partnership whereby Catalent will provide support ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The SDX® Respiratory Gating System , ... reached its 20th anniversary of worldwide use. Introduced in the US over the ... University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Maryland, University of California San ...
(Date:7/22/2020)... ... , ... Join experts from Reed Tech , Gary Saner, Sr. Manager, ... hour live webinar on Thursday, August 13, 2020 at 11am EDT (4pm ... devices. Specifically, for medical devices, the NMPA has departments dealing with medical device registration ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... MILWAUKEE (PRWEB) , ... July 16, 2020 , ... “We ... at Third Wave Bioactives. “It’s the only technology of its kind on the market ... flavor of onions with the protective capacity of traditional cultured ingredients, creating a natural ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: