HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
From hot springs to rice farms, scientists reveal new insights into the secret lives of archaea

In the world of microbes, as in politics, some groups just can't seem to shake the label ''extremist.'' So it is with archaea (ar-KEY-uh), a collection of bacteria-like microorganisms whose unique genetics and chemical structure separate them from all other living things.

For years, biologists have pigeonholed archaea as extremophiles-creatures that live in extreme conditions. Indeed, many species of archaea thrive in environments that would kill other organisms, from Yellowstone hot springs to the hyper-salty Dead Sea to streams polluted by mining waste where the pH level is equivalent to battery acid. Archaea even inhabit the warm, dark environs of our intestines and mouth.

While extremophiles have been the subject of intense research, scientists are just now beginning to focus on the large number of archaeal species that inhabit more mundane environments, including soils and seawater.

At 1:30 p.m. PT Monday, Dec. 11, an international panel of researchers will present new findings about the extreme and not-so-extreme world of archaea during the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco's Moscone Center South, Room 256. The session will be moderated by Chris Francis, assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences at Stanford University, and David Valentine, associate professor of Earth science at the University of California-Santa Barbara.

''Archaea have been a pretty hot topic for a number of years in the microbial ecology and physiology realm,'' Francis said, noting that most biology textbooks now divide life into three domains-Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, a category that includes plants, animals, fungi, algae and protozoa.

Scientists believe that the most recent common ancestor of all three domains was a single-cell organism that lived in extreme conditions when the Earth was very young and very hot, and the atmosphere contained large amounts of methane instead of
'"/>

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-915-0088
Stanford University
7-Dec-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related biology news :

1. Watching rocks grow: Theory explains landscape of geothermal springs
2. UGA researchers propose new hypothesis on the evolution of hot springs microorganisms
3. Protein nanosprings most resilient found in nature
4. Nano springs eternal; Protozoan engine posts nano records
5. Spectacular new discoveries arising from deep ocean hot springs
6. WCS says avian flu prevention should focus on farms, markets
7. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
8. Smithsonian scientists show differing patterns of rainforest biodiversity
9. Weizmann Institute scientists discover a control mechanism for metastasis
10. Cornell scientists link E. coli bacteria to Crohns disease
11. UCLA scientists produce functioning neurons from human embryonic stem cells

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/3/2020)... , ... August 03, 2020 , ... ... announced a new partnership with medical equipment manufacturer, Spectrum Solutions, to provide COVID-19 ... to strengthen their laboratory supply chain for more than 10 years. Early in ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 30, 2020 , ... Justin Zamirowski ... with a near term focus on Type 2 diabetes and associated comorbidities. , ... multiple therapeutic areas and classes. As Chief Commercial Officer, Justin will lead ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... A study has been published ... Neoasis™ active noise control device to attenuate typical noises in a simulated neonatal ... the alarm sounds from patient monitors, ventilators and other bedside devices that would ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2020)... ... 2020 , ... True Terpenes , the leading platform for terpene innovation, ... to research the medical potential of terpenes and the potential entourage effect , ... board is focused on expanding the recently launched line of effects-based terpenes - ...
(Date:8/7/2020)... ... August 06, 2020 , ... ... announces it has closed on the purchase of greenfield for a new, expanded ... and includes over 21 acres in the initial acquisition, with an option to ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... 29, 2020 , ... Diversified Technologies, Inc. has introduced a ... to drive Klystrons, TWTs, IOTs, and magnetrons. , DTI Radar Transmitter Systems ... a push-pull configuration; yielding fast fall time for a capacitive load. These all ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 30, 2020 , ... ... software for the life sciences industry, today announced the release of its ... specifically for Medical Science Liaisons (MSLs) and other field medical professionals. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: