HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Genetically modified parasite lets researchers probe immune system's memory

St. Louis, October 20, 2004 -- Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pennsylvania have found an immune system cell can "remember" a parasite's attack and help the body mount a more effective defense against subsequent invasions by the same parasite.

The finding, published in the October issue of Nature Medicine, will likely aid efforts to develop a vaccine for Leishmania major, a parasite that infects approximately 12 million people worldwide, causing significant death and disfigurement. It may also help efforts to develop vaccines for other pathogens including AIDS and tuberculosis.

Scientists have known that successful recovery from Leishmania infection immunizes humans and animals against subsequent infection. But previous experiments led researchers to suspect that this immunity resulted from the presence of a very small population of parasites that remained in the host even after full recovery. Loss of this minimal parasite remnant seemed in some studies to result in loss of immunity.

For the new study, immunologists at the University of Pennsylvania infected mice with a genetically modified form of Leishmania created by microbiologists at Washington University School of Medicine. The modified Leishmania lacks an enzyme required for DNA synthesis and can be completely wiped out by the mouse immune system.

Researchers found that after the mice had cleared the Leishmania parasite, a type of T cell -- the CD4+ central memory T cell -- still reacted to the parasite in the test tube. Mice who never had Leishmania and were given injections of these T cells fought off the parasite more effectively than mice that didn't get the T cells.

"This partial immunization suggests that we may need to look at generating large populations of these memory T cells at the time of vaccination," says study coauthor Stephen Beverley, Ph.D., the Marvin A. Brennecke Professor and head of the Depa
'"/>

Contact: Michael C. Purdy
purdym@wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine
20-Oct-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Genetically altered cells may help artificial skin fight infection
2. Genetically engineered blood protein can be used to split water into oxygen and hydrogen
3. Genetically altered mice no longer like cocaine
4. Genetically engineered mosquitoes show resistance to dengue fever virus
5. Genetically engineered animals help in scientific research that may benefit children
6. Genetically modified maize not found in southern Mexico
7. Genetically modified rice in China benefits farmers health, study finds
8. Genetically modified natural killer immune cells attack, kill leukemia cells
9. Genetically engineered corn poses no immediate threat to Mexican crops
10. Genetically endowed worm may substitute for rodents in some toxicology testing
11. Study finds that a womans chances of having twins can be modified by diet

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/14/2019)... ... August 14, 2019 , ... An upcoming episode of ... microbiome therapeutics are helping to promote normal immune function in order to prevent ... educate about the DECODE.DESIGN.CURE™ technology platform, which rapidly develops microbiome therapeutics in order ...
(Date:8/14/2019)... ... ... Representatives with MyBioGate announced that China Focus@Biotech Week will be held September 10 ... connect with Chinese pharma and investors in healthcare innovation,” said Miao Guo, Vice President ... a part of Biotech Week Boston – the annual biotech festival at the No. ...
(Date:8/14/2019)... ... 13, 2019 , ... Dr. Julie Reck of Veterinary Medical Center of Fort Mill ... first stem cell patient, her own geriatric Australian Shepherd, Simon, was treated in June 2019 ... to play but his body was weak, and he struggled to play fetch and other ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/17/2019)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 , ... Tucker, ... osteoarthritis. At only four months old, Tucker was limping and lame on his right ... and elbow dysplasia and it was called “the worst case the vet had seen.” ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 16, 2019 , ... MyBioGate ... China Focus @ Biotech Week Boston, a forum organized by MyBioGate, Inc. and ... innovation. , After a careful process of evaluation, twelve companies out of over ...
(Date:9/9/2019)... ... 09, 2019 , ... Visikol CEO Dr. Michael Johnson recently gave a ... to characterize 3D cell culture models. The inherent problem of characterizing 3D cell culture ... to image through and therefore traditional wide-field or even confocal microscopy only tells you ...
(Date:8/29/2019)... , ... August 29, 2019 , ... ... disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar ... including several Rochester Institute of Technology faculty and alumni sequenced the microbiome found ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: