HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Genomic signatures identify targeted therapies for lung cancer

DURHAM, N.C. Any number of things can go wrong in the cells of the body to cause cancer -- and clinicians can't tell by just looking at a tumor what exactly triggered the once normal cells to turn cancerous.

New tests developed by researchers at Duke University can determine the precise patterns among thousands of genes to identify the cascade of events, or pathways, that led to the cancer.

These "genomic signatures" will give clinicians the tools they need to pursue alternatives to the traditional blunt force of chemotherapy. Following this test, patients might be treated with drugs that specifically target the faulty pathway, the researchers said.

"Traditional chemotherapy is not always effective," said Anil Potti, M.D., the study's lead investigator and an assistant professor of medicine in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy. "Even when we are able to match the right chemotherapy with the right patient, 70 percent of patients with lung cancer may not respond to therapy. We need to take a different approach to those patients, and that is where these targeted therapeutics come in."

Potti and colleagues presented their findings on Sunday, June 3, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, in Chicago. The work was funded by the Jimmy V Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

Mutations in individual cancer-causing genes, called oncogenes, set off a cascade of changes in the activity of hundreds of other interacting genes -- either increasing or decreasing their activity.

Rather than looking at each of these oncogenes individually, this new method presents a more global view by identifying the pathway encompassing all of the gene mutations that could have caused that cancer, Potti said.

The genomic test can theoretically apply to any cancer, but the Duke team focused on lung cancer because the survival rate is just 15 percent. Lung cancer now kil
'"/>

Contact: Marla Vacek Broadfoot
marla.broadfoot@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center
2-Jun-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Genomics study provides insight into the evolution of unique human traits
2. Genomic analysis uncovers new targets for HIV vaccine
3. Psychiatric Genomics Center established at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
4. NYUs Center for Comparative Functional Genomics part of $57 million MOD-ENCODE consortium
5. Genomic test could help detect radioactivity exposure from terrorist attacks
6. Elsevier launches new journal, Marine Genomics
7. Genomics throws species definition in question for microbes
8. Genomic variation easier to identify with UCSD/Brown software
9. Springer adds Genomic Medicine to biomedical publishing portfolio
10. Genomic firestorms underlie aggressive breast cancer progression
11. Genomic comparison of lactic acid bacteria published

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/10/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2019 , ... ... Calcium Symposium (ISACS) 2019 at Executive Plaza Hotel in Vancouver, Canada on September ... the knowledge of the various measures to develop healthy bone and to prevent ...
(Date:10/8/2019)... ... October 08, 2019 , ... Enplug , a ... easier than ever for businesses and organizations to use their digital signage networks ... to count down to or count up from date-related milestones, while the Holidays ...
(Date:10/4/2019)... ... October 04, 2019 , ... ... be held November 10 at the Grand Elysée Hamburg Rothenbaumchaussee in Hamburg. , ... again this November,” said Miao Guo, Vice President of Operations and spokesperson for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/22/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 20, 2019 , ... ... launch of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) testing in serum . BDNF plays ... systems. BDNF stimulates the growth and differentiation of new neurons in the brain ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... , ... September 17, 2019 , ... Tucker, a Labrador ... only four months old, Tucker was limping and lame on his right hip and ... dysplasia and it was called “the worst case the vet had seen.” He was ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 17, 2019 , ... Jennifer Hermansky and Fang Xie, ... named to Law360’s 2019 Rising Stars. Hermansky and Xie, named an Immigration Rising Star ... submissions, spanning 39 practice areas. The list highlights attorneys “whose legal accomplishments transcend their ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 16, 2019 , ... A ... Saturday, September 21st @11:00am ET. Check local listings for more information on this ... Biomedical), a molecular diagnostic company from Singapore dedicated to developing advanced diagnostic technologies ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: