HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
'Good' bacteria could save patients from infection infection by deadlier ones

Jerusalem Can it be that the stress on the use of antiseptics and antibiotics in hospitals is actually putting patients at a greater risk of suffering fatal bacterial infection?

Yes, argues Mark Spigelman, a visiting professor at the Sanford F. Kuvin Center for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine. Prof. Spigelman points to a recent BBC report on the poor record of bacterial infections in patients (the worst in Europe) in British public hospitals, especially involving the deadly MRSA (methacillin resistant staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Despite being around for 40 years, these bacteria are still basically found only in hospitals. The question Spigelman asks is why?

Spigelman, who is also a visiting professor at University College London, argues in an article appearing in the current online edition of the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England that the stress on antibiotics and scrubbing with antiseptic soap may actually open an avenue for the more virulent forms of bacteria to attack patients. This is so because these "preventive" measures destroy beneficial bacteria, while at the same time the more "nasty" bacteria are often able to survive by adapting themselves to the pharmacological means used against them.

Since different strains of bacteria do not generally occupy the same surfaces, it would be better, argues Spigelman, to allow the harmless or "good" bacteria to live in the hospital environment, thus creating a kind of natural protection against the deadlier strains.

To test his hypothesis, Spigelman suggests experimenting with antibiotic-free hospitals in which harmless bacteria would be free to exist and there would be no environmental "incentive" for the more virulent strains to develop. Any patients needing antibiotics would be transferred to hospitals where they are in use. Doctors in the antibiotic-free hospitals would not enter and tre
'"/>

Contact: Jerry Barach
jerryb@savion.huji.ac.il
972-2-588-2904
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
2-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. In limiting life span, study finds booming bacteria innocent
2. Cornell scientists link E. coli bacteria to Crohns disease
3. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
4. Researchers watch antibiotics, bacteria meet at atomic level
5. A new plant-bacterial symbiotic mechanism promising
6. Piecing together the cyanobacteria puzzle
7. New research shows vaginal bacteria vary among healthy women, need customized treatment
8. New way to target and kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria found
9. UCF professor finds bacterial pathogen may be key to understanding cancer development
10. Helping chlorine-eating bacteria clean up toxic waste
11. Researchers discover acquired DNA key to certain bacterial infection

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... Current Biology on April 17 have discovered ... Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species ... example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. , ... animals, Neotrogla is the only example in ... Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan. , During copulation, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... the process whereby the genetic information of DNA ... proteins, which have numerous different functions in living ... intermediary during gene expression, by relating the genetic ... in manufacturing proteins. , By examining the ... in an organism at a given time, researchers ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... full of wild animals and plant life, but there,s ... churning away in the soil, decomposing organic matter and ... role these fungi play in ecological systems, their identities ... scientists has generated a genetic map of more than ... was published this week in the Proceedings of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises 2Rapid and accurate mRNA detection in plant tissues 2Stanford biologists help solve fungal mysteries 2Stanford biologists help solve fungal mysteries 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 TaiGen Biotechnology Company, Limited ("TaiGen") today announced ... a leading Russian pharmaceutical company, to develop and commercialize ... Federation , Turkey and ... a novel antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial infections ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... , Jan. 14, 2014  3D Communications, a leading provider of ... regulatory, business, and media events in the United States ... former associate Virginia Cox , JD, is returning to the ... Virginia Cox re-joins 3D after more than two years of ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... and BETHESDA, Md. , ... joining together with two institutes from the National Institutes ... tools for bringing safer, more effective treatments to patients ... National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Global Record Systems, LLC, (GRS), a ... for patients, physicians, the biopharmaceutical industry, regulators, payers, ... signing of a three-year Research Collaboration Agreement (RCA) ... This initiative is designed to generate disruptive ...
Breaking Biology Technology:TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2Organovo Announces Collaboration with National Institutes of Health 2Organovo Announces Collaboration with National Institutes of Health 3Global Record Systems Announces Research Collaboration Agreement with FDA to Create a Novel “Big Data” Paradigm for Collection of Patient Safety and Outcomes Information 2
Cached News: