HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Human impacts on natural systems is topic of National Science Foundation forum

On Thursday, March 9, 2006, the National Science Foundation will hold its fifth annual mini-symposium on Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER). This year's forum focuses on understanding how humans have shaped urban, rural and natural ecosystems at every level from local to global.

The symposium will feature overviews of such topics as: land use history and patterns of biodiversity in southern Appalachian forests; climate warming and threshold changes in Arctic and boreal ecosystems; human impacts on land cover change in arid lands; ecosystem responses to hydrologic change in the Everglades; and combining archaeology and ecology in desert grasslands.

The LTER network comprises 26 field sites located primarily in the United States, but with a geographic span from the Arctic and Antarctic to the tropics. The sites represent Earth's major ecosystems, and include deserts, grasslands, forests, tundra, urban areas, agricultural systems, freshwater lakes, coastal estuaries and salt marshes, coral reefs and coastal ocean zones.

Who:
James Collins, NSF Assistant Director for Biological Sciences
Henry Gholz, NSF Program Director for Long-Term Ecological Research
LTER Scientists (Please see list on link to detailed agenda)

What:
Mini-symposium on results of Long-Term Ecological Research

When:
Thursday, March 9, 2005, 8:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m.

Where:
National Science Foundation
4201 Wilson Blvd.
Room 110
Arlington, VA 22230


'"/>

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-5395
National Science Foundation
6-Mar-2006


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Human knowledge is based upon directed connectivity between brain areas
2. Human-like altruism shown in chimpanzees
3. Human genetic deserts are teeming with significant life
4. Human activities increasing carbon sequestration in forests
5. Cell Press announces new partnership with the American Society of Human Genetics
6. Human ancestors learned to walk upright in the trees, say experts
7. Humans arent the only ones with obesity problems
8. Center for Science Writings debate: Redesigning Humanity, March 21
9. Human pubic lice acquired from gorillas gives evolutionary clues
10. GenePOPS -- Sequencing Human History: The Genetics and Commerce of Personal Ancestry
11. Human trial results show excellent safety data, from Geovaxs DNA/MVA AIDS vaccines

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... prestin was found to be a key gene responsible for ... the hair cells of the inner ear that contracts and ... an antique phonograph horn, amplify sound waves to make hearing ... in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and ... has also independently evolved to play a critical role in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... has long been known that biomass burning ... as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires ... health. , But until the release of a ... Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of ... Jacobson,s research, detailed in a paper published July ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... team of scientists from Spain, France, and the ... that is the oldest definitive member of the ... amber. The discovery and description were made possible ... synchrotron imaging technique, which allows the detailed study ... new species is described in the journal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 2Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 3Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 4
(Date:8/1/2014)... (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 Testing ... led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues is ... defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, and ... signals interact with biochemical cues to control many ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... people over 60 are not donor candidates for bone ... time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and ... now has discovered a reason why. , "We have ... blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in ... could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 The SNIS ... with $25,000 to fund a translational research project.  ... 2011, the gift was presented at the Society ... Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. ... neurointerventional approaches to neurovascular conditions, SNIS formed the ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 ... Market Research "Electrodes for Medical Devices Market (Diagnostic Electrodes ... Therapeutic Electrodes - TENS, Pacemakers, Defibrillators, Electrosurgical and Other ... and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global electrodes market ... in 2012 and is estimated to reach a market ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 4Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 5Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 6
Cached News: