HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Hypertension in African Americans linked to two genomic regions

St. Louis, Feb. 9, 2005 -- A first-of-its-kind application of a novel statistical method of analysis to African Americans has identified regions on chromosomes 6 and 21 that likely harbor genes contributing to high blood pressure in that group. The novel statistical method, called admixture mapping, narrowed the search for genes related to hypertension, bringing researchers and doctors closer to finding more effective treatments.

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, among others, collaboratively conducted the study, which will be published in the February issue of Nature Genetics and is available online.

In the U.S., 65 million people have high blood pressure, but it is found more often in African Americans than other groups. African Americans suffer from earlier and more severe hypertension and have a higher rate of death from stroke, heart disease, and kidney failure as a result.

The causes of hypertension are complex. Diet, exercise and stress contribute, but so do genetic factors. "It wouldn't be surprising if hypertension involved dozens of genes," says Dabeeru C. Rao, Ph.D., director of the Division of Biostatistics and one of the report's authors. "Unfortunately, in the past there have been conflicting reports about genes linked to the condition."

In a fresh approach to the problem, the researchers applied a genome-wide scan that compared how often genetic variations occur in people of African or European descent to how often they occur in African Americans.

As a group, African Americans can trace their ancestry largely to populations from both Africa and Europe. "The statistical technique we used is ideal for groups who have a trait with a higher occurrence--such as hypertension in African Americans--and who stem from two sets of ancestral populations that have differing genetic variations," Rao s
'"/>

Contact: Gwen Ericson
ericsong@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine
9-Feb-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. ISNs Nexus Hypertension-Kidney debate
2. Penn researchers awarded $1.1 million for Pulmonary Hypertension Center
3. Hypertension risk in African-Americans linked to genetics, Stanford study finds
4. Clues to future evolution of HIV come from African green monkeys
5. First all-African produced genetically engineered maize is resistant to maize streak virus
6. New clue why MS affects African-Americans differently than Caucasians
7. Stressed-out African naked mole-rats may provide clues about human infertility
8. Slow wave activity during sleep is lower in African-Americans than Caucasians
9. OSA symptoms more common among African-American women than Caucasians
10. West African Ocean sediment core links monsoons to global climate evolution
11. African carnage -- 1 years seized ivory likely came from 23,000 elephants

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Hypertension African Americans linked two genomic regions

(Date:4/17/2014)... honored Clemson professor Rajendra Singh Thursday as a ... and expand solar deployment in the residential, commercial ... Banks Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ... considered a local hero leading the charge across ... in solar power and driving policy changes at ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires ... forest loss during drought years, according to a ... in the Amazon could reach a "tipping point" ... to large-scale loss of trees, making recovery more ... Penn State. , "We documented one of the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... a stark warning on the possible effects of gases ... 32 times that of carbon dioxide. Now a team ... as fully regenerable electron acceptors which helps explain why ... of being released to the atmosphere. However, there are ... enter into a vicious cycle to release large amounts ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):White House honors Clemson professor as 'Champion of Change' for solar deployment 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 3Methane climate change risk suggested by proof of redox cycling of humic substances 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... MA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 iLab Solutions, ... Detwiler as the new Director of Product Strategy. In this ... well as iLab sub-teams to guide in the development of ... iLab provides the maximum possible benefit to the scientific community ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (OTCQX: RXII), a biotechnology ... therapies addressing major unmet medical needs using RNA-targeted ... of Allowance from the United States Patent and ... (sd-rxRNA®), for the treatment of fibrosis. The patent ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014   Kinaxis ®, provider of RapidResponse ®, a ... operations planning ( S&OP ) service, is proud to be ... will be held at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, January ... Elisabeth Kaszas , Director of Supply Chain at Amgen, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 14, 2014 Kerr Corporation, a leading manufacturer ... additional how-to information about dual arch impressions on its dental ... Arch Impressions,” the blog entry serves up a list of ... a step-by-step demonstration by Dr. David Little as he crafts ...
Breaking Biology Technology:iLab Solutions Announces Michelle Detwiler as the New Director of Product Strategy 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 3Event Alert: Kinaxis Customer to Present at the Biomanufacturing Summit "Supply Chain: Improving Network Effectiveness" 2
Cached News: