HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Identity theft, cancer detection among interactive demos at UH event

HOUSTON, March 31, 2006 Cancer detection, homeland security and Mars topography are among the subjects of 12 interactive displays that will be showcased during an open house at the University of Houston.

Open to the public, the event will be held 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, April 8 on the fifth floor of the Philip G. Hoffman Building at Entrance 14, off Cullen Boulevard at UH, and is hosted by the computer science department. To see all available demonstrations will take about two hours.

It is being held to educate the public on the future of computing and provide information to high school and community college students interested in pursuing a computer science education.

"The exhibits we have lined up introduce a totally new way of approaching computer science and demonstrate a renewed impact of our work on society," said Marc Garbey, UH computer science professor and chair of the department. "This is an exciting time in our field, because interdisciplinary collaborations and sophisticated computing are allowing computer scientists to create tools and solve problems in areas like the environment and medicine."

About a million dollars worth of equipment will be on display, such as a high-performance computing booth used by UH researchers to solve problems ranging from modeling Houston's air quality to creating designer drugs targeted at cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases. Other demonstrations will include a display of computational biomedicine techniques that look at cells for early signs of cancer, as well as have applications in heart attack risk detection.

Additional exhibits involve high-tech animation, smart robots, thermal facial imaging for health screening at a distance, 3-D infrared face recognition for identity theft, brain activity analysis for understanding brain function and behavior, teaching geometry to a computer through machine learning, remotely controlling robot cars and charact
'"/>


31-Mar-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Protein chatter linked to cancer activation
2. Newly created cancer stem cells could aid breast cancer research
3. Green tea boosts production of detox enzymes, rendering cancerous chemicals harmless
4. ESF EURYI award winner aims to stop cancer cells reading their own DNA
5. No evidence that widely prescribed statins protect against prostate cancer
6. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
7. New study suggests Concord grape juice may provide protection against breast cancer
8. New test improves detection of liver cancer
9. High-intensity ultrasound may launch attack on cancer, wherever it lurks
10. Unknotting DNA clue to cancer syndrome
11. Biologists at Tufts University discover 1 reason why chromosomes break, often leading to cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Identity theft cancer detection among interactive demos event

(Date:4/17/2014)... in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in ... to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial ... of USC. , Professor Songtao Shi, principal investigator on ... by the cells governs the flow of calcium ions. ... that results in osteogenesis, or the creation of new ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... deforestation and fragmentation of forests in the Amazon ... forests, contributing to rapid and widespread forest loss ... researchers., The findings show that forests in the ... droughts coupled with forest fires lead to large-scale ... Jennifer Balch, assistant professor of geography, Penn State. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... -- Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs ... This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis ... of over 25 million Americans. , "We had not ... at such early stages," said Ann Elsner, professor and ... lead author of the study. "We set out to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 3New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage 2New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... Automotive, a group of car dealerships headquartered in ... Center and offering free oil change coupons for participation in ... 18 at the Bill Jacobs Cadillac and Chevrolet location from ... )  The Bill Jacobs Auto annual blood ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... SAN JOSE, California , January 15, 2014 ... for cancer, today announced the appointment of Thomas C Reynolds ... over 20 years, development experience gained in the biotechnology industry, ... "I am delighted to welcome Tom at this transformative ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 Two champions ... continued their sponsorship of an annual competition for middle ... and access to, innovative STEM study. The competition presents ... TEAMS: Tests of Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics, and Sciences ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... AudioNotch is the internet's leading provider ... treatment of tinnitus. Patients listen to sound therapy that ... period of weeks to months, their tinnitus volume decreases. , ... Notched Music and Notched White Noise. Now, AudioNotch is pleased ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Join the Bill Jacobs Auto blood drive and receive a free oil change 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 2Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 3Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 4Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 5
Cached News: