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Identity theft, cancer detection among interactive demos at UH event

HOUSTON, March 31, 2006 Cancer detection, homeland security and Mars topography are among the subjects of 12 interactive displays that will be showcased during an open house at the University of Houston.

Open to the public, the event will be held 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, April 8 on the fifth floor of the Philip G. Hoffman Building at Entrance 14, off Cullen Boulevard at UH, and is hosted by the computer science department. To see all available demonstrations will take about two hours.

It is being held to educate the public on the future of computing and provide information to high school and community college students interested in pursuing a computer science education.

"The exhibits we have lined up introduce a totally new way of approaching computer science and demonstrate a renewed impact of our work on society," said Marc Garbey, UH computer science professor and chair of the department. "This is an exciting time in our field, because interdisciplinary collaborations and sophisticated computing are allowing computer scientists to create tools and solve problems in areas like the environment and medicine."

About a million dollars worth of equipment will be on display, such as a high-performance computing booth used by UH researchers to solve problems ranging from modeling Houston's air quality to creating designer drugs targeted at cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases. Other demonstrations will include a display of computational biomedicine techniques that look at cells for early signs of cancer, as well as have applications in heart attack risk detection.

Additional exhibits involve high-tech animation, smart robots, thermal facial imaging for health screening at a distance, 3-D infrared face recognition for identity theft, brain activity analysis for understanding brain function and behavior, teaching geometry to a computer through machine learning, remotely controlling robot cars and charact
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31-Mar-2006


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