HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Immune cell receptors act in combination to regulate attack

The complexities of the mammalian immune system allow our bodies to fend off countless diseases. But researchers are still working to pin down exactly how it works -- and to understand why some people's antibodies, and some therapeutic antibodies, are better able to fight off disease than others'. In research published in today's issue of Science, Rockefeller researchers show how a newly discovered receptor may be partly responsible.

Two competing theories exist as to why some subclasses of antibodies, called IgG isotypes, are more effective against pathogens than others. The older and most-accepted model holds that certain isotypes are better at activating blood proteins called complement, which bind to a viral, bacterial or tumor cell and kill it by punching holes in its surface. An alternative model, however, suggests that the different isotypes have varying affinities to the four different antibody receptors on an immune cell's surface -- three of these receptors act as activators, one acts as an inhibitor, and together they determine whether the cell is turned on or off.

A new study by Jeffrey Ravetch, head of Rockefeller's Leonard Wagner Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology, and Falk Nimmerjahn, a postdoctoral fellow in the lab and the paper's first author, provides overwhelming evidence in favor of the second theory. Their research shows that it's the receptors that dictate how efficiently an antibody will recognize a foreign cell, bind to it, and destroy it. By studying mice in which one receptor at a time was blocked, and then comparing their ability to fight off tumors, Ravetch and Nimmerjahn illustrate how a receptor they'd discovered earlier this year is a vital piece of the puzzle. It seems that different antibody isotypes bind to different receptors, thus determining how effectively a foreign cell will be destroyed: If the antibody selectively engages only the inhibitory receptor, the immune cell won't attack. The new recepto
'"/>

Contact: Kristine Kelly
kkelly@rockefeller.edu
212-327-7146
Rockefeller University
2-Dec-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Immune system escape hatch gives cancer cells traction
2. Immune antibodies penetrate neurons to clear Alzheimers-linked amyloid
3. Immune response to cancer stem cells may dictate cancers course
4. Immune systems in breast cancer survivors who suffer from fatigue fail to shut off after therapy
5. Immune response to HIV in the brain
6. Immune substances may help antibody-based drugs fight cancer
7. Immune system has evolved to prevent autoimmune disease
8. Immune cells known as macrophages linked to growth of lymph vessels in eyes, scientists discover
9. Immune systems distress signal tells bacteria when to strike back
10. Immune cells genetic jam session is controlled by cell division machinery
11. Immune systems initial response to cancer under study

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 25, 2020 , ... Genedata, ... that it has entered into a multi-year contract with Merus N.V., a ... translational and clinical research strategy to discover and develop ground-breaking drugs. The ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... ... today announced that the company has received ISO9001:2015 certification for the development ... research industries. The decision to pursue ISO9001 accreditation demonstrates Kemp’s commitment to ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... THE WOODLNDS, Texas (PRWEB) , ... June 23, ... ... in X-ray analytical instrumentation, is pleased to announce the next event in a ... of X-ray scattering. , The TOPIQ series of webinars was developed in response ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... MIAMI (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... nearly 200 of the top radiation centers in 16 countries, has reached its ... years, SDX® is now in routine use at top universities including University of ...
(Date:7/22/2020)... ... July 22, 2020 , ... Join experts from Reed ... Manager Regulatory Solutions, in a one hour live webinar on Thursday, August ... in China for drugs and medical devices. Specifically, for medical devices, the NMPA has ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... “We are thrilled to deliver this new ... only technology of its kind on the market and we were pleased that the ... capacity of traditional cultured ingredients, creating a natural way to extend the shelf life ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 17, 2020 , ... dicentra , a leading ... food industries, is pleased to announce that Charles Galea has joined its clinical ... Charles is an accomplished and results-driven sales executive with over 10 years of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: