HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Individual differences in taste perception directly related to genetic variation in taste receptors

Philadelphia, PA -- Why do brussels sprouts taste bitterly repellent to one person and bland - or even delicious - to the next?

A study published in the February 22 issue of Current Biology confirms the influential role of genetics in determining the wide range of human sensitivity to taste, ultimately impacting how we each perceive the world in a slightly different way.

"Each human carries their own distinctive set of taste receptors which gives them a unique perception of how foods and medicines taste," explains Monell Chemical Senses Center psychophysicist Paul Breslin, PhD, who shares first authorship and is a corresponding contributor for the study. "This paper shows that a single gene codes for multiple forms of a taste receptor, with each form having a differing sensitivity to taste compounds. Further, a person's perceptual sensitivity to these bitter tasting compounds corresponds strikingly well with their genetically-determined receptor sensitivity."

In the paper, researchers at the Monell Center and collaborating institutions related individual perception of the bitter-tasting compounds PTC and PROP to variation in a bitter taste receptor gene known as hTAS2R38.

The researchers cloned two forms (haplotypes) of the hTAS2R38 gene and expressed the corresponding receptors in a cell culture. The two haplotypes, known as PAV and AVI, vary with respect to amino acid substitutions encoded at certain positions on the taste receptor protein.

In the cell culture experiments, small amounts of the bitter compounds activated cells expressing the PAV form of the receptor, whereas cells expressing the AVI form were unresponsive to the same compounds. Cells expressing other haplotypes (eg PVI, AAI or AAV) had intermediate sensitivity to the bitter compounds.

Other experiments examined bitterness perception in human subjects. People with the PAV form of the hTAS2R38 gene were most sensitive to the bitter taste of PROP a
'"/>

Contact: Paul Breslin
breslin@monell.org
215-898-5021
Monell Chemical Senses Center
21-Feb-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Individual differences in a clock gene predict decline of performance during sleep deprivation
2. Individuals and populations differ in gene activity levels, not just genes
3. Individuals with genetic conditions twice as likely to report health insurance denial
4. Individual taste receptor variations determine classic PTC bitterness perception
5. Individualized medicine emerging from gene-environment studies
6. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
7. Sugar and spice and everything nice: Health differences in newborn girls and boys
8. New tumor markers -- Spot the differences
9. Brains reflect sex differences
10. Gene analysis might explain ethnic differences in sensitivity to chemotherapy in lung cancer
11. Analysis of rhesus monkey genome uncovers genetic differences with humans, chimps

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/30/2014)... October 2014 Biological membranes are mainly composed of ... of solution ions onto lipid membranes helps clarify ... study provides a quantitative description of the equilibria ... Kotyńska and Zbigniew Figaszewski from the University of ... describing these findings, just published in EPJ ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... 2014, Beaverton, OR) New research presented at ... Conference in Houston, TX showed for the first ... infection in women using a readily available nutritional ... presented by Dr. Judith A. Smith, Pharm.D., associate ... Reproductive Sciences at The University of Texas Health ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... nanoparticles is all the rage. Thousands of scientists worldwide ... of whether titanium dioxide nanoparticles from sun creams can ... carbon nanotubes from electronic products are as hazardous for ... nanoparticles in food can get into the blood via ... research funds are flowing – and the number of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Ion adsorption matter in biology 2HPV infections in women eradicated by AHCC, Japanese mushroom extract 2Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard 2Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard 3
(Date:10/30/2014)... Oct. 30, 2014  Ardelyx, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... on cardio-renal, gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases, today announced ... results on Thursday, November 6, 2014. Following the ... live conference call and webcast at 4:30pm ET ... a business update. The live webcast ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... On October 26th at the Mid ... leading applied stem cell research scientist Neil Riordan, ... talks on New Techniques for Enhancing Stem Cell ... Cells. , Dr. Riordan focused on historical medical ... AlphaGEMS that include: wound healing; inflammation and pain ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... James Sherley says he has been working towards ... technology since his days as a principal investigator at the ... 1990’s. Sherley founded the ASCTC as a new Boston ... intellectual property developed in Sherley’s research over the years since ... Technology (MIT), and more recently as a senior scientist at ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... Avure Technologies celebrates a year of success and the one-year ... of high volume High Pressure Processing (HPP) systems. , “We’re ... PackExpo this year, which is where we first announced the ... CEO at Avure. “Sales of the new Avure machine are ... challenges of market demand for higher throughput. We sold our ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Ardelyx to Report Third Quarter 2014 Financial Results on November 6, 2014 2Riordan-McKenna Institute Founders, Neil Riordan, PhD and Orthopedic Surgeon, Dr. Wade McKenna Present at the Mid American Regenerative and Cellular Medicine Showcase 2Riordan-McKenna Institute Founders, Neil Riordan, PhD and Orthopedic Surgeon, Dr. Wade McKenna Present at the Mid American Regenerative and Cellular Medicine Showcase 3Riordan-McKenna Institute Founders, Neil Riordan, PhD and Orthopedic Surgeon, Dr. Wade McKenna Present at the Mid American Regenerative and Cellular Medicine Showcase 4Boston’s Adult Stem Cell Technology Center, LLC Introduces A New Technology for Monitoring Previously Elusive Adult Stem Cells 2Boston’s Adult Stem Cell Technology Center, LLC Introduces A New Technology for Monitoring Previously Elusive Adult Stem Cells 3Boston’s Adult Stem Cell Technology Center, LLC Introduces A New Technology for Monitoring Previously Elusive Adult Stem Cells 4In High Demand: New High Pressure Processing (HPP) System with Maximum Throughput Drives Strong Sales 2In High Demand: New High Pressure Processing (HPP) System with Maximum Throughput Drives Strong Sales 3
Cached News: