HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Microbe's genome reveals insights into ocean ecology

Rockville, MD - Unexpected findings about the genetic makeup of a marine microbe have given scientists a new perspective on how bacteria make a living in the ocean a view that may prove useful in wider studies of marine ecology.

By deciphering and analyzing the DNA sequence of Silicibacter pomeroyi, a member of an important group of marine bacteria, scientists found that the metabolic strategies of marine bacterioplankton are more diverse and less conventional than previously thought.

In one surprise, the study found that S. pomeroyi has the genetic tools to enable it to use inorganic compounds (such as inorganic sulfur) for energy, which allows the microbes to use organic carbon more efficiently in low-nutrient ocean environments.

Analysis of the genome sequence also showed that the microbe has adapted in ways that allow it to take advantage of so-called ocean "hot spots" microscopic areas of the ocean that are rich in organic matter, typically related to living and dead microbial cells. The study, which appears in the December 16 issue of Nature, was led by scientists at the University of Georgia's Department of Marine Sciences and at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), along with several collaborators. The project was sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

S. pomeroyi named for Lawrence Pomeroy, a UGA biologist who was a pioneer in the study of marine microbial ecology is a member of an important group of marine microbes, the Roseobacter clade, found in both coastal and open oceans. Those bacteria account for an estimated 15 percent of the production of new microbial cells in the ocean.

The Nature paper's first author, Mary Ann Moran, says the DNA sequence sheds new light on ecological strategies that sustain microbial life in the world's oceans.

"This genome is especially significant for the new theories it will generate ab
'"/>

Contact: Robert Koenig
rkoenig@tigr.org
301-795-7880
The Institute for Genomic Research
15-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Microbes genome promises insight into Earths carbon and sulfur cycling
2. Unravelling new complexity in the genome
3. One species, many genomes
4. First genome-wide study of infectious disease opens new avenues for HIV treatment, vaccines
5. Charting ever-changing genomes
6. Neutral evolution has helped shape our genome
7. Sea anemone genome provides new view of our multi-celled ancestors
8. Cloning the male genome may help infertile men
9. Mutating the entire genome
10. Exploring the dark matter of the genome
11. New findings challenge established views on human genome

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Microbe genome reveals insights into ocean ecology

(Date:10/15/2014)... , Oct. 15, 2014   Neurotechnology , ... announced the availability of the VeriLook Surveillance ... 3.0 provides real-time biometric face identification using live ... surveillance cameras. The new version not only identifies ... people from objects while they are moving through ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... N.Y. – Scientists have sequenced the house fly genome ... one might expect from an insect that thrives in ... published Oct. 14 in the journal Genome Biology ... biology and of how flies quickly adapt to resist ... Adult house flies (Musca domestica) carry and transmit more ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been ... (NIH) to lead an investigation of Lassa fever virus, ... The study aims to understand how Lassa fever virus ... survive the inflection. , "The ultimate goal is ... Lassa fever virus causes disease and develop new treatments ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):VeriLook Surveillance 3.0 SDK Identifies Faces and Moving Objects, Differentiates Pedestrians from Other Moving Objects in Video Surveillance Systems 2VeriLook Surveillance 3.0 SDK Identifies Faces and Moving Objects, Differentiates Pedestrians from Other Moving Objects in Video Surveillance Systems 3House fly genome reveals expanded immune system 2Scripps Research Institute team receives $6.6 million to investigate deadly Lassa virus 2
(Date:10/22/2014)... , Oct. 22, 2014 Nuvilex, Inc. (OTCQB: ... 400 million people worldwide are living with diabetes, with  ... by 2030.  The global market for diabetes treatments is ... 330,000 people worldwide died from pancreatic cancer.  Pancreatic cancer ... to cancer in the United States ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... Richardson, Texas (PRWEB) October 20, 2014 ... today announced that a team from Iowa State University ... * design contest. Using a Convey HC-2ex, the team’s ... than 14 times faster than the second place finisher. ... academic world embarked upon the month long challenge, using ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... PureTech , a science and technology development ... today the closing of a $55 million growth ... a $120 Billion group of funds. The funding ... forward and to advance new healthcare related products ... really go for the big ideas that can ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... OCTOBER 20-22, 2014: The 9th ... will take place at the Congress Center ... is now available at http://www.abim.ch . ... organizations from all over the globe will ... latest products and developments on the world ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Nuvilex Brief Analyst Report: Thinking Outside the Box by BrokerBank Securities, Inc. 2Team from Iowa State Wins 2014 MemoCODE Design Contest Using Convey HC-2ex 2Team from Iowa State Wins 2014 MemoCODE Design Contest Using Convey HC-2ex 3PureTech Announces Expansion with Oversubscribed $55M Funding Round 2PureTech Announces Expansion with Oversubscribed $55M Funding Round 3PureTech Announces Expansion with Oversubscribed $55M Funding Round 4PureTech Announces Expansion with Oversubscribed $55M Funding Round 5PureTech Announces Expansion with Oversubscribed $55M Funding Round 6
Cached News: