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'Might have been' key in evaluating behavior

HOUSTON (May 14, 2007) "What might have been" or fictive learning affects the brain and plays an important role in the choices individuals make and may play a role in addiction, said Baylor College of Medicine researchers and others in a report that appears online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

These "fictive learning" experiences, governed by what might have happened under different circumstances, "often dominate the evaluation of the choices we make now and will make in the future, " said Dr. P. Read Montague, Jr., professor of neuroscience at BCM and director of the BCM Human Neuroimaging Laboratory and the newly formed Computational Psychiatry Unit. "These fictive signals are essential in a person's ability to assess the quality of his or her actions above and beyond simple experiences that have occurred in the immediately proximal time."

Using techniques honed in previous experiments that studied trust, Montague and his colleagues used an investment game to test the effects of these "what if" thoughts on decisions in 54 subjects. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure blood flow changes in specific areas of the brain, they precisely measured responses to economic instincts.

These blood flow changes in the brain reflect alterations in the activity of nerve cells in the vicinity. In this case, they measured the brain's response to "what could have been acquired" and "what was acquired." This newly discovered "fictive learning" signal was measured, localized and precisely parsed from the brain's standard reward signal that reflects actual experience.

Each subject took part in a sequential gambling task. The player makes a new investment allocation (a bet) and then receives a "snippet" of information about the market either the market went up and the investment was a good one or the market goes down and the play had a loss. Each subject received $100 and played
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Contact: Kimberlee Barbour
kbarbour@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine
14-May-2007


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