HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Migration study finds that sweeping management changes are needed to protect Atlantic bluefin tuna

A team of marine scientists has mapped the undersea journeys of Atlantic bluefin tuna and concluded that tighter restrictions should be placed on commercial fishing to protect the feeding and breeding grounds of this top migratory predator--one of the most commercially valuable fish in the sea.

Researchers from Stanford University and the Monterey Bay Aquarium say that their new study, published in the April 28 edition of the journal Nature, offers substantial evidence that significant changes need to be made in how Atlantic bluefin tuna fisheries are managed internationally and in the United States.

"In my lifetime we've brought this majestic species to the doorstep of ecological extinction in the western Atlantic Ocean," says Barbara A. Block, the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Professor in Marine Sciences at Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station and lead author of the Nature study. "Electronic tagging provides the best scientific information we've ever had to properly manage these tuna and we must, as an international community, start to act responsibly to ensure the future of this species."

An expert on large migratory fish, Block is a founder and the co-director of the Tuna Research and Conservation Center (TRCC), a joint collaboration between Stanford and the Monterey Bay Aquarium. For the past 10 years, she and her colleagues have braved the rough waters of the Atlantic Ocean to carry out an unprecedented study of bluefin tuna migrations. Working with sport and commercial fishers in the Carolinas and New England, as well as commercial fleets in the Gulf of Mexico, TRCC researchers have placed electronic tags on hundreds of wild bluefin tuna ranging in size from 150 to 900 pounds. The tags track individual fish as they travel thousands of miles across the sea, to depths below 3,000 feet, in search of food and mates. Each tag records the tuna's migration pattern, diving behavior, body temperature and the temperature of the surrounding water.<
'"/>

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University
27-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Related biology news :

1. Migration alert -- How tumor cells home in on the lymphatic system
2. New study warns limited carbon market puts 20 percent of tropical forest at risk
3. Clones on task serve greater good, evolutionary study shows
4. Pollution causes 40 percent of deaths worldwide, study finds
5. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
6. New study suggests Concord grape juice may provide protection against breast cancer
7. Preclinical study links gene to brain aneurysm formation
8. In limiting life span, study finds booming bacteria innocent
9. Multicenter study nets new lung tumor-suppressor gene
10. MIT study: Maturity brings richer memories
11. Chickadee, nutchatch presence in conifers increases tree growth, says CU-Boulder study

Post Your Comments:
(Date:8/28/2014)... Minn. A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators ... up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for ... uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. ... engineering are described in two back-to-back papers in the ... a broad range of uses for all types of ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... 28, 2014  Privacy Advocate and Senior Staff Attorney ... , joins the lineup of biometric and mobile commerce ... UnPlugged Executive Summit in Tampa, Florida ... announced speakers include Steven Rahman, Director, Technology and Strategy at ... Experian. The theme of this year,s event is Mobility ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the ... occurs when the regions of the brain that ... use of non-invasive functional neuroimaging tools has helped ... However, most prior work has focused on only ... gap in our understanding of how multiple brain ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New tool aids stem cell engineering for medical research 2Biometrics UnPlugged Welcomes the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Jennifer Lynch to the Mobility at the Crossroads of Commerce and Privacy Summit 2Dyslexic readers have disrupted network connections in the brain 2
(Date:8/27/2014)... BOSTON , Aug. 27, 2014 Rhythm, ... diseases and genetic deficiencies that result in metabolic disorders, ... on Form S-1 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange ... of shares of its common stock. The number of ... the offering have not yet been determined. ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... YORK , Aug. 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... research report is available in its catalogue: ... 2014-2018 http://www.reportlinker.com/p02316661/Global-Biodegradable-Packaging-Materials-Market-2014-2018.html ... materials are materials that are readily decomposed ... differs from conventional non-degradable packaging in terms ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... is how plants survive impact by the huge ... while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis ... blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire ... DTU Physics have now managed to successfully ,film, ... contain light-absorbing proteins which play a role in ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... Aug. 27, 2014 Reportlinker.com announces that ... its catalogue: Global Chelating Agents Market ... About Chelating Agent A chelating agent is ... with metal ions, thereby forming a metal-ion complex. ... have on chemical processes, formulations, and the environment ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Rhythm Files Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering 2Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 2Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 3Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 4Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 5Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 6Global Biodegradable Packaging Materials Market 2014-2018 7DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time 2Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 2Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 3Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 4
Cached News: