HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Modified herpes virus keeps arteries 'free-flowing' following procedures

A genetically engineered herpes simplex virus, primarily known for causing cold sores, may help keep arteries free-flowing in the weeks following angioplasty or stent placement for patients, according to research published early in the online edition of PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America).

Christopher Skelly, MD, assistant professor of vascular surgery at the University of Chicago Medical Center, and the studys lead author says, One of the drawbacks of balloon angioplasty to open blocked arteries and the use of stents to keep them open is that arteries sometimes experience aggravation from the procedure. The balloon angioplasty, in addition to opening the artery can lead to smooth muscle cell proliferation, similar to formation of scar tissue, known as neointimal hyperplasia. This scar tissue can restrict blood flow not long after the procedures, leading to a recurrence of symptoms. A significant number of these cases end up requiring further intervention to address this complication.

Researchers at the University of Chicago noted that in recent years, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus studied for its efficacy against malignant tumors of the central nervous system and the liver was blocking certain types of cell death and proliferation of surviving cells. They wanted to test this effect in arteries following angioplasty therapy.

The researchers studied a rabbit model that replicates the restenosis or renarrowing after angioplasty. Rabbits that underwent angioplasty alone experienced significant narrowing of the artery. Rabbits exposed to the herpes simplex virus during angioplasty had minimal changes in the arteries. The smooth muscle cell proliferation which causes the restenosis was very low in the group treated with herpes and remained high in the untreated group.

One undesirable, yet expected outcome of angioplasty and stent placement is the disruption o
'"/>

Contact: Scot Roskelley
scot.roskelley@uchospitals.edu
773-795-0892
University of Chicago Medical Center
10-Jul-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Modified mushrooms may yield human drugs
2. Insulator helps silence genes in dormant herpes virus
3. Anti-herpes treatment reduces HIV levels in women infected with both viruses
4. Research holds promise for herpes vaccine
5. Achilles heel of the herpes virus possibly found
6. Live vaccines more effective against horse herpes virus
7. Licorice licks herpes virus infection
8. Topical treatment shown to inhibit HIV and herpes simplex virus infection
9. Features of replication suggest viruses have common themes, vulnerabilities
10. Marijuana component opens the door for virus that causes Kaposis sarcoma
11. Discovery in plant virus may help prevent HIV and similar viruses

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/23/2020)... ... August 21, 2020 , ... The August edition ... and is now available on the company’s global website. Crystallography Times—an electronic newsletter ... presenting current news and crystallographic research. , The latest issue of Crystallography ...
(Date:8/21/2020)... ... 2020 , ... “How can we help?”, asks Hans Schroeder, ... for more than twenty years. Together with Douglas Granger, Ph.D., founder of Salimetrics ... of Interdisciplinary Saliva Research and Applications ," and Steven Granger, Ph.D., Chief Scientific ...
(Date:8/21/2020)... ... August 20, 2020 , ... NDA Partners Chairman ... Clinical Operations executive with expertise in clinical trial planning and feasibility, regulatory inspection ... Expert Consultant. Throughout his career, Mr. Movahhed has helped design and manage oncology, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... ... eSource has long been touted as the solution to high data management and monitoring ... did not take off as quickly as people initially expected, and where eSource is ... data electronically for clinical trials and then repurposing it for downstream analysis, at a ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... 2020 , ... “We are thrilled to deliver this new technology to the ... its kind on the market and we were pleased that the IFT jury recognized ... cultured ingredients, creating a natural way to extend the shelf life and improve the ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... July 09, 2020 , ... ... called 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) is commonly used to suppress pigment formation in zebrafish embryos, ... PolyU research team led by Dr MA has been using the zebrafish model ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... June 29, 2020 , ... ... access to competitively procured purchasing contracts to its membership, recently named BioFit ... TIPS members with the opportunity to purchase ergonomic seating, cafeteria tables, book trucks ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: