HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Monkeys adapt robot arm as their own

DURHAM, N.C. -- Monkeys that learn to use their brain signals to control a robotic arm are not just learning to manipulate an external device, Duke University Medical Center neurobiologists have found. Rather, their brain structures are adapting to treat the arm as if it were their own appendage.

The finding has profound implications both for understanding the extraordinary adaptability of the primate brain and for the potential clinical success of brain-operated devices to give the handicapped the ability to control their environment, said the researchers.

Led by neurobiologist Miguel Nicolelis of Duke's Center for Neuroengineering, the researchers published their findings in the May 11, 2005, issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Lead author on the paper was Mikhail Lebedev in Nicolelis's laboratory. Other coauthors were Jose Carmena, Joseph O'Doherty, Miriam Zacksenhouse, Craig Henriquez and Jose Principe. The work was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the James S. McDonnel Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation.

In the study, Lebedev performed detailed analysis of the mass of neural data that emerged from experiments reported in 2003, in which the researchers discovered for the first time that monkeys were able to control a robot arm with only their brain signals.

In those experiments, the researchers first implanted an array of microelectrodes -- each thinner than a human hair -- into the frontal and parietal lobes of the brains of two female rhesus macaque monkeys. The faint signals from the electrode arrays were detected and analyzed by the computer system the researchers developed to recognize patterns of signals that represented particular movements by an animal's arm.

In the initial behavioral experiments, the researchers recorded and analyzed the output signals from the monkeys' brains as the animals we
'"/>

Contact: Dennis Meredith
dennis.meredith@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University Medical Center
10-May-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related biology news :

1. Monkeys dont go for easy pickings
2. Monkeys understand numbers across senses
3. Monkeys pay per view
4. Identified mechanism in the malaria parasite to help it adapt to infected individuals
5. Wild weather forces farmers to adapt
6. CU researchers discover evidence of very recent human adaptation
7. How E. coli evolves to adapt to changing acidity
8. Asexual worm quickly adapts to soil contamination
9. Research suggests mens sexual behavior adapts to perceived threats
10. Healthy coastal wetlands would adapt to rising oceans
11. Scientists find mutations that let bird flu adapt to humans

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/14/2020)... , ... May 12, 2020 ... ... a platform that helps Life Science Manufacturers accurately and easily project contracted ... the development of Gross-to-Net models by projecting discounts/rebates to Commercial and Government ...
(Date:5/14/2020)... ... 14, 2020 , ... The annual salary report by MedReps ... average medical sales rep total compensation increased by $12,000 over the previous year. ... global crisis. , The MedReps 2020 Salary Survey revealed yet again there’s high ...
(Date:5/6/2020)... ... May 06, 2020 , ... Sickle Cell Disease Association ... technology company dedicated to improving the quality, safety, efficacy and cost of red blood ... SCDAA deliver on its mission and meet its goals. In 2020 Hemanext will collaborate ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/23/2020)... NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (PRWEB) , ... April 22, ... ... shortage of essential equipment for healthcare providers to protect themselves from COVID-19. Virginia ... it requests from the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA). , As Governor Northam ...
(Date:4/7/2020)... ... ... Gateway Genomics , leading developer of direct-to-consumer genetic tests that give ... sold in March, just months after attaining the 150,000-test landmark in late 2019. ... could order her kit online, collect a DNA sample from her home, mail it ...
(Date:4/1/2020)... ... March 31, 2020 , ... Carterra® Inc., the world ... (LJI), announced today that they will use Carterra’s proprietary LSA™ platform to screen hundreds ... the clinic as early as this summer. , La Jolla Institute for Immunology ...
(Date:3/19/2020)... , ... March 18, 2020 , ... ... monitor users’ bio signals to provide rapid insight into their perceptions of events. ... have on the other. What if they could measure the level of engagement ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: