HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Native plant eaters have gourmet palates

Here's a test. Take a crayfish, offer it two meals one the native plants that it eats everyday, the other a gourmet meal of a similar, but exotic species of plant. Conventional biological wisdom predicts it will stick with the tried and true. But new research at the Georgia Institute of Technology suggests that plant eaters may be more adventurous than previously thought and prefer to nosh on exotic meals by a ratio of three to one. The findings, which appear in the September issue of Ecology Letters, could point the way to better strategies for controlling the billions of dollars in damage that invasive species cause every year.

The research runs counter to the enemy release hypothesis, first proposed by Charles Darwin in 1859, which holds that exotic species become invasive because they are free from the pressures of being eaten by their natural enemies in their native environment. Left without these controls, exotic plant species can run amuck and crowd out the native flora.

"What enemy release doesn't take into account is that while exotic plants may be free from their so-called natural enemies from their home range, they gain novel enemies in their new range," said John Parker, graduate student at Georgia Tech. "Because they've never had to adapt to being eaten by these consumers, they may lack the appropriate defenses to ward them off, essentially going from the frying pan into the fire."

Parker and biology professor Mark Hay tested the enemy release hypothesis with two species of crayfish found in the southeastern United States and one species of grass carp that had previously been introduced from Asia to control aquatic weed growth.

They paired 10 exotic plants with related native plants in the lab to test how the crayfish would respond when given a choice between similar plants. They found the crayfish preferred the exotic plants by a ratio of three to one.

In another part of the study, they took a broader view of fe
'"/>

Contact: David Terraso
david.terraso@icpa.gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology
12-Sep-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Native fruits bear sweet antioxidants
2. Native lands issues to be highlighted at 8th World Wilderness Congress
3. American Indians and Alaska Native veterans have higher mortality rate after surgery than Caucasians
4. Joslin hosts conference on diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Natives, May 16-19 in Denver
5. Military hazards are greater for Native Americans, according to sociological research
6. Circadian clock controls plant growth hormone
7. New system of wastewater treatment could reduce the size of treatment plants by half
8. First case of successful ovarian tissue transplantation between two, nonidentical sisters
9. Discovery in plant virus may help prevent HIV and similar viruses
10. US Department of Defense awards $1.6 million for implantable biochip research
11. News conference on plant diseases and issues important to California

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/25/2018)... , ... December 24, 2018 , ... ... The Rockefeller University have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept ... spam control, blocking unwanted files and messages. Using blacklisting as a filter to ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... ... ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, MD, announced today that Deb Koeneman, ... and Radiological Health (CDRH), has been appointed a Partner in the firm. Ms. Koeneman ... more than 25 years of regulatory experience. In addition to her FDA career, she ...
(Date:12/18/2018)... ... December 18, 2018 , ... The nation’s ... into client marketing. The technology has been effective at reducing patient acquisition costs ... been working with clients nationwide on patient acquisition marketing programs. Traditional marketing for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/7/2019)... ... January 07, 2019 , ... Kainos Medicine Inc. today announced ... candidate, code-named "KM-819." KM-819 is an orally active small molecule that is ... Korea. , This Phase 1 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose-escalation study was to ...
(Date:12/20/2018)... ... December 20, 2018 , ... New Year’s brings reflection and ... in regulations in the European Union (EU) on the horizon, Jim Kasic, president and ... “The transition to the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR), digital health, and big data ...
(Date:12/18/2018)... ... ... Patients with early stages of breast cancer who undergo partial breast proton ... irradiation, a new study suggests. , Patients with early stage breast cancer — stage ... the cancerous tumor because there is a 30 to 40 percent change the disease ...
(Date:12/13/2018)... ... December 13, 2018 , ... Microbial Discovery Group ... This has been part of their strategic plan and an important milestone in ... custom fermentation opportunities for MDG within the $44 Billion human probiotic market. This ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: