HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Nature can help reduce greenhouse gas, but only to a point

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.--Plants apparently do much less than previously thought to counteract global warming, according to a paper to be published in next week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The authors, including Bruce Hungate of Northern Arizona University and lead author Kees-Jan van Groenigen of UC Davis, discovered that plants are limited in their impact on global warming because of their dependence on nitrogen and other trace elements. These elements are essential to photosynthesis, whereby plants remove carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from the air and transfer carbon back into the soil.

"What our paper shows is that in order for soils to lock away more carbon as carbon dioxide rises, there has to be quite a bit of extra nitrogen available--far more than what is normally available in most ecosystems," said Hungate of NAU's Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research.

The paper notes that various plants can pump nitrogen from the air into soils, and some researchers expected rising carbon dioxide to speed up this natural nitrogen pump, providing the nitrogen needed to store soil carbon. However, the research team found that this process, called nitrogen fixation, cannot keep up with increasing carbon dioxide unless other essential nutrients, such as potassium, phosphorus and molybdenum, are added as fertilizers.

The study, which analyzed all published research to date, challenges recent assessments and model projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that anticipated large increases in soil carbon with rising carbon dioxide.

"The discovery implies that future carbon storage by land ecosystems may be smaller than previously thought, and therefore not a very large part of a solution to global warming," Hungate said.

That's not to say plants are not effective deterrents to global warming. Hungate said about half of the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphe
'"/>


10-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Natures weapon against nerve agents
2. Natures secrets yield new adhesive material
3. Nature surrenders flowery secrets to international team
4. Nature Genetics and the International Society of Nephrology come to Danvers on World Kidney Day
5. UCSB study on sibling detection mechanism highlighted in Nature
6. USC study in Nature Genetics supports a stem cell origin of cancer
7. Biolex reports potential for more potent, efficacious antibodies in Nature Biotechnology
8. Natures process for nitrogen fixation caught in action
9. Origen publishes in Nature a robust and versatile method for creating transgenic chickens
10. FSU scientists biomolecular research published in Science, Nature
11. Nature meets technology at Georgia Techs conference on bio-inspired design

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Nature can help reduce greenhouse gas but only point

(Date:7/24/2014)... N.J. A yearlong study funded by the New ... Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy ... in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of ... survey respondents, 45 percent indicated they were "pessimistic" or ... by Superstorm Sandy would be rebuilt better than they ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... team of researchers led by the University of York ... conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. , The ... point to a revolution in the management of marine ... more than 11,000 km in the region now ... are zones of the seas and coasts designed to ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... on his work with a new drug that successfully treated ... Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research ... to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases., Chandra Mohan, ... Engineering at UH, previously published a study in Arthritis Research ... successfully treated lupus in mice and reduced the number of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding 2Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation 2Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 2Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 3
(Date:7/24/2014)... , July 24, 2014  Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. ... emerging field of regenerative medicine, announced today that ... presentation to investors on Tuesday, July 29, 2014, ... presentation will include an overview of Asterias, business ... webcast, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/asterias-biotherapeutics at least 15 ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... sophisticated equipment, trained personnel, and detection dogs to ... attacks. A revolutionary new electronic chip with nano-sized ... much easier. , The groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor, devised ... ,s School of Chemistry and Center for Nanoscience ... Tracense, picks up the scent of explosives molecules ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... yet to materialise. Yet, scientists are making progress ... faster. One such approach relies on quantum dotsa ... an electric field. A new study demonstrates that ... dots (TQDs) with electrical impulses can help better ... TQDs be used as quantum information units, which ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Although most natural and synthetic processes prefer to ... potential or energyit is within the realm of ... experience constant changes in energy and phases, such ... These conditions allow humans to regulate their body ... rumble with seismic activity. , But even ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Live Investor Webcast 2Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Live Investor Webcast 3Asterias Biotherapeutics Announces Live Investor Webcast 4Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs 2New approach to form non-equilibrium structures 2
Cached News: