HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Nature can help reduce greenhouse gas, but only to a point

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.--Plants apparently do much less than previously thought to counteract global warming, according to a paper to be published in next week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The authors, including Bruce Hungate of Northern Arizona University and lead author Kees-Jan van Groenigen of UC Davis, discovered that plants are limited in their impact on global warming because of their dependence on nitrogen and other trace elements. These elements are essential to photosynthesis, whereby plants remove carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from the air and transfer carbon back into the soil.

"What our paper shows is that in order for soils to lock away more carbon as carbon dioxide rises, there has to be quite a bit of extra nitrogen available--far more than what is normally available in most ecosystems," said Hungate of NAU's Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research.

The paper notes that various plants can pump nitrogen from the air into soils, and some researchers expected rising carbon dioxide to speed up this natural nitrogen pump, providing the nitrogen needed to store soil carbon. However, the research team found that this process, called nitrogen fixation, cannot keep up with increasing carbon dioxide unless other essential nutrients, such as potassium, phosphorus and molybdenum, are added as fertilizers.

The study, which analyzed all published research to date, challenges recent assessments and model projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that anticipated large increases in soil carbon with rising carbon dioxide.

"The discovery implies that future carbon storage by land ecosystems may be smaller than previously thought, and therefore not a very large part of a solution to global warming," Hungate said.

That's not to say plants are not effective deterrents to global warming. Hungate said about half of the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphe
'"/>


10-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Natures weapon against nerve agents
2. Natures secrets yield new adhesive material
3. Nature surrenders flowery secrets to international team
4. Nature Genetics and the International Society of Nephrology come to Danvers on World Kidney Day
5. UCSB study on sibling detection mechanism highlighted in Nature
6. USC study in Nature Genetics supports a stem cell origin of cancer
7. Biolex reports potential for more potent, efficacious antibodies in Nature Biotechnology
8. Natures process for nitrogen fixation caught in action
9. Origen publishes in Nature a robust and versatile method for creating transgenic chickens
10. FSU scientists biomolecular research published in Science, Nature
11. Nature meets technology at Georgia Techs conference on bio-inspired design

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Nature can help reduce greenhouse gas but only point

(Date:10/17/2014)... German . ... When treating overdoses, doctors are often limited to supportive therapy ... is a combination of drugs involved. So what can be ... grandmother,s pills? ETH professor Jean-Christophe Leroux from the Institute of ... to this question. "The task was to develop an agent ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... can be cultivated efficiently, they are anything but ... by monoculture cultivation is becoming increasingly evident. Despite ... form and are regarded as the sole possibility ... quite wrongfully, finds Bernhard Schmid, an ecology professor ... novel form of agriculture and forestry. After all, ...
(Date:10/15/2014)... assess the pandemic risk from strains of influenza virus ... allow ourselves to become complacent that the most substantial ... scientists. , Influenza pandemics arise when a new virus ... widespread immunity – spreads in the human population. There ... years, the worst of which – the 1918 Spanish ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Emergency aid for overdoses 2Emergency aid for overdoses 3Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 2Plant communities produce greater yield than monocultures 3Scientists 'must not become complacent' when assessing pandemic threat from flu viruses 2
(Date:10/22/2014)... The Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market ... in Americas with analysis and forecast of revenue. ... Inorganic Refrigerants Market report, to get an idea ... a glimpse of the segmentation in the Americas ... tables and figures. , http://www.micromarketmonitor.com/market/americas-inorganic-refrigerants-4191654241.html ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... October 21, 2014 Shimadzu Scientific Instruments ... data tool for the pain management and clinical markets. ... processing and review by allowing users to highlight and ... , QuantAnalytics allows analysts to filter results by ... data processing by eliminating the need to sift through ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... WriteResult, LLC – a premier provider of ... a team of researchers from Yale University’s School of ... to provide electronic questionnaire data collection through use of ... in May, aims to evaluate the impact of a ... and participation in urban agriculture to impact their consumption ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... 22, 2014 Grace Century, a private ... projects, announces the addition of Dr. Yousef “Josh” ... advisory team. Dr. Siddiqui will provide further healthcare expertise ... graduate of University College Medical School in ... medicine in 2001. With further certification as a General ...
Breaking Biology Technology:The Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market is estimated to grow to $71.6 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market is estimated to grow to $71.6 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3Shimadzu Releases QuantAnalytics Open Access LCMS Software Package for Clinical Applications 2myPROpad™ Topic of Panel Discussion at the Yale Food Systems Symposium 2myPROpad™ Topic of Panel Discussion at the Yale Food Systems Symposium 3Dr. Yousef Siddiqui joins the Grace Century Advisory Team 2
Cached News: