HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
New possibilities for flu antiviral and vaccine research emerge from 'Spanish flu' virus

The 1918 Spanish flu was a global disaster, killing an estimated 20 to 50 million people, many of them otherwise healthy adults. By partially reconstructing the Spanish flu virus, researchers have now discovered at least part of what made the virus so lethal, thus providing essential information for influenza drug and vaccine research.

The research appears in the 7 October issue of the journal Science, published by AAAS, the nonprofit science society.

The Spanish flu virus is more closely related to avian flu viruses than other human flu viruses. Many experts say that it is only a matter of time before an avian flu outbreak occurs in humans and develops into a global pandemic, potentially costing millions of lives.

Therapies against a new flu strain would need to disarm the parts of the virus that do the most damage to the body. In order to learn which components of the virus would be the best targets for such therapies, Terrence Tumpey of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and his colleagues revisited the 1918 Spanish flu virus.

Their results may also provide a benchmark for measuring the potential virulence of future flu strains as they emerge.

Using the virus' genome sequence, whose final three genes are being published simultaneously this week in Nature, Tumpey's group created a live virus with all eight of the Spanish flu viral genes. The genome sequence information was recovered in fragments from lung autopsy materials and lung tissues from a flu victim who was buried in the Alaskan permafrost in 1918.

The virus is contained at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), following stringent safety conditions designated for flu viruses and heightened security elements mandated by the CDC's Select Agent program.

"We felt we had to recreate the virus and run these experiments to understand the biological properties that made the 1918 virus so exceptionally deadly. We wanted to identi
'"/>

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
1-202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science
5-Oct-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Potent possibilities for parasite attack
2. Heart failure: Intervention possibilities from imaging programmed cell loss
3. Research on microfluidics widens the possibilities for electronic devices
4. Plants, plasmids and possibilities -- Methods permit functional gene studies in plants
5. Poplar DNA code cracked -- new possibilities for sustainable energy
6. New possibilities to fight pests with biological means
7. Brains opioid receptorsor endorphin systemmay hold key to treatment possibilities for bulimia
8. Alzheimers disease; new approach, new possibilities?
9. HIV prevention hope: Yogurt bugs that make antiviral drugs
10. The reason why antiviral therapy cant annihilate HIV infection, and what to do about it
11. Novel antiviral technology inhibits RSV infection in mice

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/18/2020)... MARTINSRIED, Germany and CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... April 16, 2020 ... ... gene delivery technologies for gene and cell therapy, today announced it will present a ... the April 2020 Virtual Investor Summit taking place on April 22 and ...
(Date:4/15/2020)... ... April 15, 2020 , ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, MD , ... Science Policy Advisor with the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and former Branch ... Health, has joined the firm as an Expert Consultant. , Dr. Suleiman has expertise ...
(Date:4/9/2020)... ... April 08, 2020 , ... Biolytic Lab Performance, Inc. ... platform for high throughput nucleic acid synthesis. Designed to be operated in both ... and therapeutic applications for various viruses, diseases and conditions where large quantities of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/1/2020)... ... April 30, 2020 , ... The winners of Fast ... projects, and concepts that are actively engaged and deeply committed to changing the ... taken out the top prize in the Experimental category. , The RASTRUM™ 3D ...
(Date:4/22/2020)... Hungary and CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... April ... ... in Budapest with US offices in Cambridge, MA, announced today that Omixon’s founder ... led the early commercialisation of Omixon’s flagship product Holotype HLA since 2014 before ...
(Date:4/18/2020)... ... April 17, 2020 , ... ... Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program to support the expansion of its digital health ... NSF, which conducts a rigorous merit-based review process, adds to NeuroFlow’s recent ...
(Date:4/1/2020)... ... March 30, 2020 , ... Kinetic Vet, an animal ... EPA-approved spray-on antimicrobial solution. As a first-of-its-kind technology within the animal health industry, ... against microorganisms for up to 90 days. , In addition to reducing the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: