HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
New study sheds light on long-term effects of logging after wildfire

PORTLAND, OR. April 9, 2007. A new study on the effects of timber harvest following wildfire shows that the potential for a recently burned forest to reburn can be high with or without logging. Recently published in the journal, Forest Ecology and Management, the study demonstrates that the likelihood of a severe reburn is affected by the timing not just the amount of fuel accumulation after fire.

The study examines fuel accumulation with and without logging after a large wildfire in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon. Three treatments were examined: commercial logging that removed only dead trees with value for wood products, commercial logging plus thinning that removed all dead trees larger than 4 inches in diameter, and unlogged sites.

The year after logging (3 years after the fire), sites that were logged and thinned had four times more fine fuels on the ground, as a result of logging residue, compared to unlogged sites. Those same sites also had fewer snags which provide habitat for woodpeckers, owls, and other animals that nest in tree cavities and contribute to large woody debris on the ground. However, logging activity caused no change in the litter or duff, the upper soil organic layers that also affect how a fire burns. The study was led by James McIver of Oregon State University and Roger Ottmar of the Pacific Northwest Research Station, U.S. Forest Service.

The investigators used a computer model to project how fuels and fire hazard would change over time. "Long-term research and monitoring are not always possible," says McIver. "Although we would rather have the long-term data, using a model allows us to estimate some of the future ecological effects."

The computer simulation showed that the difference in surface fuels between logged and unlogged units would persist for about 15 years. The simulation also showed that if a fire did start during this time, it would likely kill most young trees as the
'"/>

Contact: Sherri Richardson Dodge
srichardsondodge@fs.fed.us
503-808-2137
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station
9-Apr-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. New study warns limited carbon market puts 20 percent of tropical forest at risk
2. Clones on task serve greater good, evolutionary study shows
3. Pollution causes 40 percent of deaths worldwide, study finds
4. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
5. New study suggests Concord grape juice may provide protection against breast cancer
6. Preclinical study links gene to brain aneurysm formation
7. In limiting life span, study finds booming bacteria innocent
8. Multicenter study nets new lung tumor-suppressor gene
9. MIT study: Maturity brings richer memories
10. Chickadee, nutchatch presence in conifers increases tree growth, says CU-Boulder study
11. Phase II study of therapeutic vaccine shows efficacy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/19/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Project Lifeline – a community partnership and research ... substance use disorder (SUD) – will take center stage at the upcoming ... program’s effectiveness in preventing and treating opioid abuse in Blair County, Pennsylvania, will receive ...
(Date:11/14/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2019 , ... ... that Robert Peterson, RAC , a regulatory affairs and program management executive ... biopharmaceutical and medical device industries, has joined the firm as an Expert Consultant. ...
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... November 12, 2019 , ... G5, ... improves digital advertising performance up to 25% and reduces cost-per-click by as much ... uses advanced multi-touch attribution (MTA) to predict best advertising outcomes and automatically allocate ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... 2019 , ... CaroGen Corporation , a biotechnology company, today announced three ... Jack R Wands, MD, of Brown University , Dr. Steve Projan, PhD, ... MD, PhD, of Wayne State University, formerly a professor at Yale University School of ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... October 29, 2019 , ... ... skin*. Using Silios CMS-C multispectral imagers , researchers identified people by the ... identification based on retinal imaging, face recognition, fingerprints and vasculature. , The ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ANGELES (PRWEB) , ... October 22, 2019 , ... nQ ... Graziadio Business School’s 2019 Most Fundable Companies List which was announced at a showcase ... than $10 million in annual revenue, strong business plans, and impressive near-term growth projections ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ... October 22, 2019 , ... Enplug , a ... Notification System into its digital signage platform. The collaboration brings one of the ... for users to leverage their existing digital signage networks to quickly disseminate critical ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: