HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Nobelist discovers antidepressant protein in mouse brain

A protein that seems to be pivotal in lifting depression has been discovered by a Nobel Laureate researcher funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

"Mice deficient in this protein, called p11, display depression-like behaviors, while those with sufficient amounts behave as if they have been treated with antidepressants," explained Paul Greengard, Ph.D., a Rockefeller University neuroscientist who received the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discoveries about the workings of such neuronal signaling systems. He and his colleagues found that p11 appears to help regulate signaling of the brain messenger chemical serotonin, a key target of antidepressants, which has been implicated in psychiatric illnesses such as depression and anxiety disorders. They report on their findings in the January 6, 2005 issue of Science.

Brain cells communicate with each other by secreting messengers, such as serotonin, which bind to receptors located on the surface of receiving cells. Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), medications commonly prescribed for anxiety and depression, compensate for reduction in serotonin signaling by boosting levels and binding of serotonin to receptors. Previous studies have suggested that serotonin receptors are essential in regulating moods and in mediating the effects of SSRIs, but given the complexity of the serotonin system, exactly how these receptors work remains a mystery.

To explore how a particular serotonin receptor (5-HT1B) functions, Greengard and colleagues conducted tests to find out what proteins these receptors interact with in brain cells. They found that 5-HT1B interacts with p11, and according to Greengard, p11 plays a role in the recruitment of receptors to the cell surface where they are more functional.

This finding led the researchers to suspect that p11 levels might be directly involved in the development of depression, anxi
'"/>

Contact: Latifa Boyce
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health
5-Jan-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. deCODE discovers cause of major subtype of glaucoma
2. UB scientist discovers novel iron-copper alliance
3. Research team discovers gallstone gene
4. University of Pittsburgh discovers genetic shut down trigger in healthy immune cells
5. Scripps research team discovers a chemical pathway that causes mice to overeat and gain weight
6. Joslin discovers protein that causes blood vessel leakage and swelling with diabetic retinopathy
7. Nevada scientist part of team that discovers hybrid speciation in butterflies in Sierra
8. ROV discovers Antarctic seafloor fauna
9. Contrary to common wisdom, scientist discovers some mammals can smell objects under water
10. Mayo researcher discovers target site for developing mosquito pesticides
11. Cambridge led team discovers gene mutation which prevents carriers from feeling pain

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/19/2019)... ... August 19, 2019 , ... Since ... use of ultra-thin two dimensional slices which are placed on microscope slides, stained ... complex tissues and complicated features such as vasculature and thus researchers in the ...
(Date:8/15/2019)... ... ... Deep Science Ventures (DSV), a new paradigm for applied science, today announced ... 100 companies over the next 10 years to address the urgent need for new ... was founded to create a better method for launching science companies; one that takes ...
(Date:8/15/2019)... ... , ... Serialization deadlines in the US and European Union ... becomes fully applied in the United States in 2023, pharmaceutical companies are scrutinizing ... most regulations?including the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA)?have required minimal system capabilities. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/9/2019)... ... July 08, 2019 , ... Today, at the BIO World Congress ... Association (NCGA) announced the winners of the Consider Corn Challenge II. Three winners ... field corn to produce biobased materials. , “Corn is a sustainable, abundant and ...
(Date:6/18/2019)... ... ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a human adipose-derived stem cell ... of a person’s own adipose-derived stem cells to treat their osteoarthritis. The first clinical ... IND is the first of several planned clinical trials which will enable qualified PSC-enrolled ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... and ROANOKE, Va. (PRWEB) , ... June 11, ... ... optimized for microlearning engagement, and Carilion Clinic, a national leader in opioid treatment, ... latest in virtual care. , Mytonomy recently deployed its virtual care ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 29, 2019 , ... ... providing proprietary interest to our methodology, processes, and diagnostic techniques. The patent ... extends Somnology’s IP rights including our proprietary sleep scoring methodology. The approval ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: