HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
On the cutting edge: Carbon nanotube cutlery

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU) have designed a carbon nanotube knife that, in theory, would work like a tight-wire cheese slicer. In a paper presented this month at the 2006 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition*, the research team announced a prototype nanoknife that could, in the future, become a tabletop tool of biology, allowing scientists to cut and study cells more precisely than they can today.

For years, biologists have wrestled with conventional diamond or glass knives, which cut frozen cell samples at a large angle, forcing the samples to bend and sometimes later crack. Because carbon nanotubes are extremely strong and slender in diameter, they make ideal materials for thinly cutting precise slivers of cells. In particular, scientists might use the nanoknife to make 3D images of cells and tissues for electron tomography, which requires samples less than 300 nanometers thick.

By manipulating carbon nanotubes inside scanning electron microscopes, 21st-century nanosmiths have begun crafting a suite of research tools, including nanotweezers, nanobearings and nano-oscillators. To design the nanoknife, the NIST and CU scientists welded a carbon nanotube between two electrochemically sharpened tungsten needles. In the resulting prototype, the nanotube stretches between two ends of a tungsten wire loop. The knife resembles a steel wire that cuts a block of cheese.

To begin demonstrating the feasibility of their knife design, the researchers assessed its mechanical strength in force tests, applying increasing pressure to the device. The team found that the welds were the weakest point of the nanoknife, and they are now experimenting with alternative welding techniques. The researchers plan to test the nanoknife on a block of wax later this year (cells typically are immobilized in wax for dissection and microscopy.)


'"/>

Contact: Mark Bello
mark.bello@nist.gov
301-975-3776
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
22-Nov-2006


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Rove beetles act as warning signs for clear-cutting consequences
2. NIH awards nearly $21 million to fund cutting-edge research equipment
3. CSH Protocols publishes cutting-edge methods for analyzing complex molecular interactions
4. Small-scale logging leads to clear-cutting in Brazilian Amazon
5. Plant-cell-produced technologies-cutting edge approach to bringing solutions to the market
6. Logging doubles threat to the Amazon, rivaling clear-cutting, study suggests
7. Delays in cutting greenhouse gasses could harm environment
8. Academy eBriefings offer comprehensive reports on more than 100 cutting-edge scientific issues
9. Delay in cutting the cord helps premature babies
10. Over the edge: New therapeutic strategy takes advantage of stressed cancer cells
11. Tough tubes -- Carbon nanotubes endure heavy wear and tear

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/14/2019)... ... December 12, 2019 , ... Crop Enhancement ... yields, has appointed Jean Pougnier as chief business officer. Mr. Pougnier will lead ... and influencers that will position the company for maximum commercial success. As part ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... December 04, 2019 , ... Cartessa Aesthetics ... Advanced Plasma Technology for U.S. dermatologists, plastic surgeons and licensed aesthetic providers. ... to employ LF technology – low frequency plus a patented wavelength and power ...
(Date:11/27/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a human adipose-derived ... hosted by Dr. Steven Sampson and Dr. Danielle Aufiero of the Orthohealing Center ... highlighted the ongoing efforts to promote research, educate the public, and provide support to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/22/2020)... , ... January 21, 2020 , ... QCDx , ... biopsy from a simple blood draw, today announced the sale of the proprietary RareScope™ ... Rare Scope will be used in clinical cancer research. , “The RareScope can detect ...
(Date:1/8/2020)... ... January 08, 2020 , ... Anomet ... achieve specific properties for use in harsh environments inside or outside of the ... to three metals or alloys to achieve specific properties such as corrosion-resistance, biocompatibility, ...
(Date:1/7/2020)... ... January 06, 2020 , ... EconoFact, a non-profit media initiative ... at Tufts University, is pleased to announce that it was awarded a $50,000 ... Tufts University, and will help to expand the scope, exposure and distribution of ...
(Date:12/31/2019)... WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... December 31, 2019 , ... ... floor throughput the conference that will be broadly focused on 3D cell culture ... will discuss its NASH 3D cell culture assays for assessing steatosis , inflammation ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: