HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Oncologists could gain therapeutic advantage by targeting telomere protein

Inactivating a protein called mammalian Rad9 could make cancer cells easier to kill with ionizing radiation, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

The researchers found that Rad9, previously considered a "watchman" that checks for DNA damage, is actually a "repairman" that fixes dangerous breaks in the DNA double helix. They found Rad9 is especially active in telomeres, the protective ends of chromosomes.

Because of this new role, Rad9 has gained the researchers' interest as a potential target for cancer therapy -- knocking out Rad9 would enhance the power of radiation treatments by making it easier for radiation to inflict fatal damage to a tumor's genetic material. Their study appears in the March issue of the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology, which is now available online.

"Our study suggests that if we could inactivate Rad9 in tumor cells, we would be able to kill them with a very low dose of radiation and gain a therapeutic advantage," says senior author Tej K. Pandita, Ph.D., associate professor of radiation oncology and on the faculty of the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

The study revealed that Rad9 proteins interact with chromosomes' telomeres, which are special structures at the ends of chromosomes that protect them from fusion or degradation. Specifically, Rad9 proteins were shown to interact with proteins called telomere binding proteins. When the scientists inactivated Rad9 in human cells, they saw damage to chromosomes and end-to-end fusion at telomeres. DNA damage and chromosomal fusion can disrupt the cell cycle and cause cell death. Because radiation treatments increase these incidents, loss of Rad9 in cancer cells could enhance the killing effect of radiation.

Previous research had suggested that Rad9 maintains cell cycle checkpoint controls--scientists thought that the protein helped monitor D
'"/>

Contact: Gwen Ericson
ericsong@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine
16-Feb-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Newly created cancer stem cells could aid breast cancer research
2. New system of wastewater treatment could reduce the size of treatment plants by half
3. Discovery of new protein could provide new understanding of male fertility
4. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
5. How a pain in the neck could be bad for your blood pressure
6. Synchrotron could help save the Tassie devil
7. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
8. Fish eyes could hold clue to repairing damaged retinas in humans
9. New aerogels could clean contaminated water, purify hydrogen for fuel cells
10. MIT model could predict cells response to drugs
11. System to analyze beating heart stem cells could lead to heart attack treatments

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/12/2020)... ... , ... Mosio recently announced its newly updated text message-based ... all sizes. With a focus on tracking symptoms and monitoring outbreaks as well ... helps public health departments automate communications and provide more personalized care and resources ...
(Date:8/3/2020)... ... August 03, 2020 , ... Accumen Inc. is helping ... equipment manufacturer, Spectrum Solutions, to provide COVID-19 saliva testing kits nationally. , ... for more than 10 years. Early in the COVID-19 crisis, we identified supply ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... A study has been ... Medical Neoasis™ active noise control device to attenuate typical noises in a simulated ... attenuated the alarm sounds from patient monitors, ventilators and other bedside devices that ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 08, 2020 , ... Bode Technology, ... expansion of laboratory operations through its COVID-19 testing service, Bode-CARES . Bode-CARES ... , Bode-CARES provides a turnkey solution that includes a comprehensive collection ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... KONG (PRWEB) , ... July 09, 2020 , ... ... compound called 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) is commonly used to suppress pigment formation in zebrafish ... the PolyU research team led by Dr MA has been using the zebrafish ...
(Date:7/7/2020)... ... July 06, 2020 , ... R3 International is now offering stem ... 200 million stem cells. Depending on the patient's condition, treatment may be offered IV, ... die having some form of Alzheimers dementia, and the incidence continues to increase as ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... ... June 29, 2020 , ... MedShift , a leading ... despite many obstacles created as a result of COVID-19. As a provider at ... medical practices and medical manufacturers by expanding access to device offerings, technology services, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: