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Other highlights in the September 21 JNCI

Study Reports Elevated Risk of Second Cancers for Testicular Cancer Survivors

Men who survive testicular cancer have an increased risk of developing a second cancer for at least 35 years after diagnosis, according to the largest study to date of testicular cancer survivors.

Testicular cancer largely affects young men, and the 10-year survival rate of the disease is as high as 95%, so most men survive testicular cancer. However, these men have an increased risk of developing second cancers, mostly because of the late side effects of treatment. These cancers are a leading cause of death for testicular cancer patients.

To determine the risks of second cancers among long-term survivors of testicular cancer, Lois B. Travis, M.D., of the National Cancer Institute, and colleagues examined data from 40,576 1-year survivors of testicular cancer from population-based tumor registries in Europe and North America. A total of 2,285 second solid cancers were reported among these men anywhere from 1 year to more than 35 years after their testicular cancer diagnosis.

Ten-year survivors who had been diagnosed with testicular cancer at age 35 had a risk of developing a second cancer that was nearly twice that of the general population, and this risk remained elevated for 35 years. Risks were higher for patients diagnosed with testicular cancer at younger ages and lower for patients diagnosed at older ages. Cancers of the bladder, colon, lung, pancreas, and stomach accounted for 60% of the total excess risk. The authors conclude that testicular cancer survivors are at increased risk of solid tumors for at least 35 years after treatment and that young patients may face high levels of risk as they get older.

Contact: National Cancer Institute Press Office, 301-496-6641, NCIPressOfficers@mail.nih.gov

Hormone Replacement Therapy Associated With Increases in Mammographic Breast Den
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Contact: Sarah L. Zielinski
jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org
301-841-1287
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
20-Sep-2005


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